Top podcast episodes in History

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The Branch Davidians are accused of child abuse and stashing illegal firearms. With a federal investigation now underway, paranoia grows at Mount Carmel. And a government raid appears imminent. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Mejuri - Head to mejuri.com/AS or use code AS at checkout for 10% off your first order. SimpliSafe - Go to SimpliSafe.com/AS to get free shipping and a 60-day risk-free trial. Zip Recruiter - ZipRecruiter.com/worktogether.
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Annie Londonderry gained fame for being the first woman cyclist to circumnavigate the globe. Sort of. In the 1890s, she DID circle the globe, but there are a LOT of inconsistencies in the details of her story, including why she did it in the first place.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The way we treat the past is a great lens into the character of humanity. Sometimes we elevate it, but all too often we work to bury it. And while the excuse might be to make room for the march of progress, it also allows us to hide our worst mistakes and most painful tragedies. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Harry’s: You deserve a great shave at a fair price. Get your free starter kit delivered straight to your door, which includes a weighted razor handle, moisturizing shave gel, a precision-engineered 5-blade cartridge, and a handy travel cover. Visit Harrys.com/lore to get yours today. ZipRecruiter: Post your job opening to over 100 job sites with a single click, and then let their powerful technology connect the best candidates to you inside their easy-to-use Dashboard. Discover for yourself why ZipRecruiter is used by businesses of all sizes to find the most qualified job candidates with immediate results. Visit ZipRecruiter.com/lore today to get start posting jobs for free. Casper: From bedding, bed frames, and even a dog bed, Casper has everything to build the dream bedroom—for every kind of sleeper. Visit Casper.com to get $100 off your mattresses order by using the offer code LORE. Terms and conditions apply. ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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Mystery makes a story more interesting, there's no doubt about that, which is why today's tour features two people who embody that completely.
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In the 1970s, author and researcher Zecharia Sitchin discovered the prospect of an additional planet in our solar system called Nibiru. After a close examination of ancient Sumerian texts, Sitchin wrote a series of books to prove that the ancient people had not only found the planet, but had been in contact with its inhabitants.
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Maybe if Nicholas hadn't been so set on rejecting the verdict of 1905, there wouldn't be a Part II to look forward to.
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In 1794, anti-government protests grew into an all-out rebellion, and President Washington faced his first major test of federal authority. Some 7,000 armed Westerners marched on Pittsburgh and threatened its residents. Violent resistance to the whiskey tax soon spread from western Pennsylvania to Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and Georgia. Washington and his cabinet held tense meetings to debate a response to the so-called Whiskey Rebellion. The country’s first president was determined to act quickly and decisively, despite divisions among his close advisers. Nothing less than the sovereignty of the young nation was at stake. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Skylight Frame - Get $10 off your purchase of a Skylight Frame when you go skylightframe.com and enter code TELLERS. Scotts - Get the lawn of your dreams at scotts.com.
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This week, how race has played a central role in who is counted-in America.
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You stepped out of a big, air-conditioned silver bird, out into the kind of heat, sunlight and humidity that even Americans raised in the Deep South could not believe. You would wander around, wondering where your ground transport was, and what your barracks might be like, and once the immensity of the new reality fully hit, someone with more time in-country might notice your expression and mutter, "Hey man. Welcome to the suck." When USS Maddox came under attack from North Vietnamese torpedo boats while in international waters in 1964, President Lyndon Johnson uses the incident to open the throttle on the war to contain communism in Vietnam. Advising him is a Madison Avenue Wonder Boy, using computer formulas to triangulate on an elusive victory. And a dangerous, potentially fatal fossilization of politics and military doctrine slowly but inexorably plunges the United States into its darkest years of the Cold War.  Watch "Apollo 11: What We Saw" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9BmufbVf2E Listen to "Apollo 11: What We Saw" on iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/we-choose-to-go-to-the-moon-part-1/id1471188269?i=1000444360842 Listen to "Apollo 11: What We Saw" on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5nZzb7bUOltWKss5hY4K8U
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In the wake of the greatest economic depression in the country’s history so far, the Democrats battle it out over the future of monetary policy. In the midst of the debate, former Nebraska congressman William Jennings Bryan emerges as the Democrat Candidate. To win the election, Bryan will have to get the best of an affable Governor from Ohio with a message of hope for a suffering nation: William McKinley. Created, hosted and executive produced by Lindsay Graham for Airship. Sound design by Derek Behrens. Co-Executive produced by Steven Walters in association with Ritual Productions. Written and researched by Erik Archilla. Fact checking by Gregory Jackson and Cielle Salazar from the podcast History That Doesn’t Suck. Music by Lindsay Graham. If you like this show, please support it! Become a subscriber at www.wickedgamepodcast.com. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Zip Recruiter - ziprecruiter.com/worktogether
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In the 1890s, France found itself in the groups of a bizarre, troubling epidemic -- scores of men were, apparently, wandering off in a trance-like state, only to come to their senses days or weeks later, sometimes miles from home, or even in a different country. Physicians called it dromomania, or 'pathological tourism.' But what was the root cause of this seemingly contagious disorder? Join the guys as they dive into the mystery of seemingly inescapable wanderlust. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The declaration that rinderpest had been eradicated was less than 10 years, but rinderpest’s history goes back much farther than that. And the process of eradicating the disease really illustrates how it took a coordinated, international effort to do it. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Vernon Howell faces criminal charges in court. And soon, his followers begin to turn against him—fueling his paranoia, and setting the stage for his fateful standoff against the U.S. government. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Mejuri - Head to mejuri.com/AS for 10% off your first order
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More than two years after their UFO encounter in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, Betty and Barney Hill underwent hypnosis therapy with renowned psychiatrist Dr. Benjamin Simon. These sessions revealed that there was more to the Hill's story than they had previously remembered. This story was all the more remarkable because it was so different from the stories of the early years of America's fascination with UFOs - the 1950s.
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In 1993, a massive conflict erupts in rural Texas. The federal government launches a siege against the Branch Davidians, a religious group based in the outskirts of Waco. What follows is the longest firefight in the history of American law enforcement. And it’s a battle that ends in tragedy. But the standoff has its genesis years before. It’s then that Vernon Howell comes looking for a new religious community to call home. He finds it with the Branch Davidians, and soon, he begins working to seize power. Support us by supporting our sponsors! ZipRecruiter - Try ZipRecruiter FOR FREE at ZipRecruiter.com/as.
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We're jumping back just a couple of years to an episode on Ignaz Semmelweis made a connection between hand hygiene and the prevention of childbed fever in the 19th century. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In which dumb campus fads return to the American spotlight in 1973 thanks to a mild winter and legions of nude undergrads, and John gradually remembers his own complicated streaking history. Certificate #41916.
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Sarah and Mike continue their journey into the book that launched a thousand lawsuits. Michelle and Dr. Pazder’s relationship grows more troubling by the chapter. Digressions include orgy etiquette, sheepskin jackets and “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.” Neither co-host believes anything depicted in this book happened as described, but still want to warn you that it contains scenes of torture and sexual abuse. Support us: patreon.com/yourewrongabout paypal.me/yourewrongabout https://www.teepublic.com/stores/youre-wrong-about?ref_id=10420 Continue reading →
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Ida Lewis lived most of her life fairly isolated on a tiny island off the coast Rhode Island. But it was a life she deeply loved. In her words, “I could not be contented elsewhere.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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He purged Wallachia of enemies and retained an iron grip on power in the region. But as Vlad the Impaler's power expanded, so did his violent, paranoid and psychotic behavior—until he alienated everyone around him and was violently deposed.
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Humanity has grown over the millennia by passing on knowledge through teachings and guides. Even today, how-to books are best-sellers, and people are more hungry than ever to learn and grow. But some lessons aren’t worth passing on, and in a few cases, they’ve even been incredibly destructive. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, which includes free postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE. Policygenius: We’ll always get the future wrong, so you better get life insurance right. Policygenius makes finding the right life insurance a breeze, and could save $1500 or more per year. Find your best price and apply online at Policygenius.com.  The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: Monsters Within. ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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Japan's rising sun goes supernova and engulfs a huge area of Asia and the Pacific. A war without mercy begins to develop infusing the whole conflict with a savage vibe.
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Although the most curious items in the Cabinet are small, sometimes they're as big as a country. Today we'll explore two examples of that rare category.
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For a few decades the station wagon was as central to the American Dream as the white picket fence and the basketball hoop in the driveway. It was the quintessential family car. And really, who didn’t want to ride in the “way back”? This special episode comes from the audiobook edition of MOBITUARIES. You can learn more here: http://bit.ly/MoAudio.
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The planet hadn't seen a major war between all the Great Powers since the downfall of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. But 99 years later the dam breaks and a Pandora's Box of violence engulfs the planet.
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This 2014 episode coverts he 1918 Spanish flu epidemic, which killed somewhere between 20 million and 50 million people. Nobody cured it, or really successfully treated it. A fifth of the people in the world got the flu during the pandemic. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Anne of Boleyn was Henry VIII's second wife.
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Driving through northern New Hampshire on a clear fall night in 1961, Betty and Barney Hill spotted a light in the sky that seemed to be following them. As they navigated mountain roads, the light came increasingly closer until the Hills found themselves face to face with a craft unlike any they had seen. Thus began one of the most famous encounters in UFO lore.
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With the mechanisms of apocalypse firmly in place, both sides accelerate their efforts to determine the actual capabilities of the other. No detail is too insignificant: attempts are made to recover Soviet test warheads from the bottom of the ocean.  By the time USS Triton circumnavigates the globe underwater, the full potential of the nuclear submarine as the preeminent weapon of the Cold War becomes apparent. And so the ever-increasing pressure to discover how many warheads the other side has, and how they work, and most importantly, where they are, the United States and the Soviet Union diverge in regard to intelligence gathering. The massive US lead in technology leads to spy satellites, hypersonic reconnaissance planes and the most ambitious intelligence operation in human history. The Soviets, on the other hand, play to their strengths as well: the ability to turn individual human assets. One of these paths will lead to the biggest intel haul of the Cold War.
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EPISODE 317 In 1916 New York City became the epicenter of one of America's very first polio epidemics. The scourge of infantile paralysis infected thousands of Americans that year, most under the age of five. But in New York City it was especially bad. The Department of Health took drastic measures, barring children from going out in public and even labeling home with polio sufferers, urging others to stay away. That same year, up in the Bronx, a young couple named Daniel and Dora Salk -- the children of Eastern European immigrants -- were themselves raising their young son named Jonas. As an adult, Jonas Salk would spend his life combating the poliovirus in the laboratory, creating a vaccine that would change the world. In 1921 a young lawyer and politician named Franklin Delano Roosevelt would contract what was believed at the time to be polio. He would use his connections and power -- first as governor of New York, then as president of the United States -- to guide the nation's response to the virus. FEATURING: The story of Albert Sabin and the origin of the March of Dimes. ALSO: The second half of the show is devoted to the question -- who came up the first vaccine anyway? Presenting the story of Edward Jenner -- and a cow named Blossom. boweryboyshistory.com Subscribe to the Bowery Boys podcast today on your favorite podcast player.   Support the show.
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Tracy and Holly discuss what it feels like, as people who study history, to live through an event that you know will be historically significant. To all of our listeners: Please stay safe, and thank you for being part of the SYMHC family. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The Asia-Pacific War of 1937-1945 has deep roots. It also involves a Japanese society that's been called one of the most distinctive on Earth. If there were a Japanese version of Captain America, this would be his origin story.
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The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia, a collective of independently owned and operated podcasts. 20 stories, each 20 seconds, to accompany you in the proper washing of hands. Stay safe, be well, wash your hands.
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The Great Powers all come out swinging in the first round of the worst war the planet has ever seen. Millions of men in dozens of armies vie in the most deadly and complex opening moves of any conflict in world history.
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In 2001, former Washington intern Chandra Levy went missing after a hiking day trip. This prompted a months-long search revealing she had been entangled with a much older California Congressman.
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Our passion for solving incomplete puzzles is something that unites us as a culture. We will chase any mystery and dig into every single question we encounter. But that attraction might also put us in grave danger, if history is any indication. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Squarespace: If you're passionate about it, show it off. Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support Build your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. SimpliSafe: Secure your home with 24/7 professional monitoring for just $15 a month. Visit SimpliSafe.com/Lore today, and you’ll get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial. ZipRecruiter: Post your job opening to over 100 job sites with a single click, and then let their powerful technology connect the best candidates to you inside their easy-to-use Dashboard. Discover for yourself why ZipRecruiter is used by businesses of all sizes to find the most qualified job candidates with immediate results. Visit ZipRecruiter.com/lore today to get start posting jobs for free. ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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This week, the story of Eugene V. Debs and the creation of American socialism.
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He is a legendary figure revered as Korea's first ruler. But Dangun’s story begins with that of his father, the son of heavens Hwanung, who dreamt of bringing peace and enlightenment to mankind.
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As we seek to understand the broader impacts of Covid-19, historian Jane Whittle looks at how the devastating plague of the 1340s significantly reshaped the economy and society of England. Historyextra.com/podcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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The ancient rebel leader Boudica has become an icon in her native Britain. She is celebrated as a symbol of resistance and female power. However, getting a sense of her true character is nearly impossible when examining the historical sources. Roman historians wrote elaborate speeches that they claimed she delivered to rapt audiences. But perhaps these speeches tell us more about the Roman authors than they do about the Celtic war leader. Tune in and find out how ancient Eminem verses, Heart of Darkness, and superhero origin stories all play a role in the story.  
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After the death of her husband in 1881, Sarah Winchester became the heiress of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Soon after she moved to her California mansion, rumors began to circulate that the heiress was being tormented by ghosts who had been killed by her husband’s invention...the Winchester rifle.
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Tracy Borman responds to listener queries and popular search enquiries about the 16th-century English royal dynasty. Historyextra.com/podcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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The war of maneuver that was supposed to be over quickly instead turns into a lingering bloody stalemate. Trench warfare begins, and with it, all the murderous efforts on both sides to overcome the static defenses.
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While Booth and Herold hurry toward their first destination, Washington descends into the chaos behind them. Ford's theatre is mayhem as the audience learns of the attack on President Lincoln. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton rushes around the city to discover the extent of the bloodshed and officially begins the manhunt for John Wilkes Booth. For more details, please visit www.blackbarrelmedia.com. Our social media pages are: @blackbarrelmedia on Facebook and Instagram, and @bbarrelmedia on Twitter.
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It's true -- once upon a time the isolated town of Key West, Florida not only seceded from the Union, but declared war on the United States (for about sixty seconds). Tune in to learn more about the short-lived Conch Republic. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Anna May Wong wasn't supposed to be in the movies. Her laundryman father was dead set against it. And Hollywood preferred white actors in "yellow face" for Asian characters. But Wong knew what she wanted. With her talent, beauty and tenacity, she ran a gauntlet of social and legal obstacles to become Hollywood's very first Chinese-American star. Mo talks with comedian Margaret Cho and actress Rosalind Chao about the woman who is finally getting her due.
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Julius Caesar is our travel guide as he takes us through his murderous subjugation of the native Celtic tribal peoples of ancient Gaul. It sounds vaguely like other, recent European colonial conquests...until the natives nearly win.
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Due to the unfortunate spread of COVID-19, Parcast has decided to halt recording for the time-being. This is a precautionary measure taken to ensure the safety of our hosts and staff. In the meantime, we're excited to share one of our classic episodes that we know you'll enjoy! Following WWII, a secret CIA mission was put in place to recruit Germany’s top scientific minds in an effort to help America’s space and defense program stay ahead of the Soviets during the Cold War.
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Only a few years after Shays’ Rebellion was suppressed, a new revolt broke out in western Pennsylvania. Anti-government resentment had been growing on the frontier for years. Then in 1791, the U.S. government handed down a tax on domestic spirits. It became known as the Whiskey Tax. Many western farmers and distillers, already struggling under harsh conditions, refused to pay the tax and rose up in defiance. Armed gangs ambushed tax collectors—and anyone who supported them. As resistance spread, authorities struggled to suppress the violence. Then, in the summer of 1794, hundreds of rebels went to battle against U.S. Army troops at Bower Hill, the mountaintop mansion of a wealthy tax collector. The rebels burned the manor to the ground and a popular rebel leader was shot dead, inflaming tensions. The federal government had an unprecedented crisis on its hands. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Quip - Go to getquip.com/TELLERS, RIGHT NOW, you’ll get your first refill FREE. SimpliSafe - Head to SimpliSafe.com/TELLERS and get free shipping and a 60-day risk-free trial.  Mack Weldon - For 20% off your first order, visit mackweldon.com and enter promo code: AHT.
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The Days of Freedom could be numbered in days.
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Holly and Tracy talk about selecting subjects for the show while living in strange times, and venture into talk about Emily Dickinson. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the craze for gin in Britain in the mid-18th Century and the attempts to control it. With the arrival of William of Orange, it became an act of loyalty to drink Protestant, Dutch gin rather than Catholic brandy, and changes in tariffs made everyday beer less affordable. Within a short time, production increased and large sections of the population that had rarely or never drunk spirits before were consuming two pints of gin a week. As Hogarth indicated in his print Beer Street and Gin Lane (1751) in support of the Gin Act, the damage was severe, and addiction to gin was blamed for much of the crime in cities such as London. With Angela McShane Research Fellow in History at the Victoria and Albert Museum and University of Sheffield Judith Hawley Professor of 18th Century literature at Royal Holloway, University of London Emma Major Senior Lecturer in English at the University of York Producer: Simon Tillotson First broadcast 15 December 2016.
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April 6, 1924. Four planes rest in the water, preparing for take-off. At 8:30 AM, they pick up speed and hit the air. Eight pilots have begun a dangerous mission: to be the first to fly around the world. This will change our future in a way that few could see in 1924. What did it take to complete this historic flight? And, when this new technology went global, what were the unintended consequences? Special thanks to our guest, Jeremy Kinney, Chair of the Aeronautics Department at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Additional thanks to Tim Grove, author of "First Flight Around the World: The Adventures of the American Fliers Who Won the Race" For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Often relegated to the role of slavish cannon fodder for Sparta's spears, the Achaemenid Persian empire had a glorious heritage. Under a single king they created the greatest empire the world had ever seen.
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Deep themes run through this show, with allegations of Japanese war crimes and atrocities in China at the start leading to eerily familiar, almost modern questions over how the world should respond. And then Dec 7, 1941 arrives...
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Folklore is our legacy. We humans have carried it with us everywhere we’ve gone in the world, and it anchors us to our roots and our community. But it also does something else: it gives us a place to hide our fear, to put it on a leash and control it. And there’s one story in particular that does that better than most. * * * This episode of Lore was sponsored by: We’ll always get the future wrong, so you better get life insurance right. Policygenius makes finding the right life insurance a breeze, and could save $1500 or more per year. Find your best price and apply online at Policygenius.com. The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: Living History: Experiencing Great Events of the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, which includes free postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE. * * * Lore Resources: Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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How did the U.S. get to the point of having this one resource, specifically for poisoning, that’s so reliable and available that it gets printed on the labels of consumer products?  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The dust had barely settled on the American Revolution when new unrest erupted in western Massachusetts. Thousands of farmers and laborers rose up in protest against unjust taxes and a state government that seemed as oppressive as the British Crown. When their demands for reform fell on deaf ears, the protesters grew more desperate. They took up muskets, swords, and clubs and formed blockades to shut down local courthouses. The growing revolt became known as Shays’s Rebellion. Boston’s government and merchant elites were horrified by the upheaval, fearing the specter of mob rule. They saw the uprising as democracy run amok, and moved to raise an army against the rebels. The showdown would test the very legacy of the American Revolution.
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Some people become extraordinary through bravery, while others achieve it through ingenuity. Both of today's stories, though, share one common trait: passion.
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Machine guns, barbed wire and millions upon millions of artillery shells create industrialized meat grinders at Verdun and the Somme. There's never been a human experience like it and it changes a generation.
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Business Wars digs deep into some of the greatest corporate rivalries of all time. Think Facebook VS Snapchat or Nike VS Adidas. On each episode we give you an inside look at what inspired entrepreneurs to take risks that drove their companies to new heights --  or into the ground. In this season “Starbucks VS Dunkin,” they follow these two java giants in a war that started brewing in the 1950s and is now hotter than ever.  Coffee is a 100 billion dollar plus global industry with these two duking it out at the top, but their battle is about more than coffee. For the full episode go to: wondery.fm/americanscandalBW
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In a world that can sometimes be obsessed with the current threat du jour, author Fred Kaplan reminds us that one of the all-time great threats to us all hasn't gone anywhere. Notes on https://dchhaddendum.libsyn.com/
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There are quite a few parallels between Mary's Mallon's story during a series of typhoid outbreaks and our present day pandemic, and so there are things we can learn from it (not the least of which is wash your dang hands!) But was Mary a villain? Or simply a victim of circumstances?
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Description:Philip II of Macedonia and his son Alexander the Great are two of the most impressive figures in history. Few could contend with either man. One woman held her own with both of them. Alexander's mother Olympias. Notes on https://dchhaddendum.libsyn.com/
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You've probably heard the old saying "the best thing since sliced bread" -- and back in the day, people in the US were genuinely over the moon about presliced bread, thanks to the work of Otto Rohwedder and his automatic bread slicer. Yet during World War II, panic over the country's food supply led to a brief ban on presliced bread... and that's when things got ugly. Tune in to learn more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Renaissance historian Catherine Fletcher explores the remarkable life and art of the acclaimed 17th-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi, whose work was due to be celebrated with a major National Gallery exhibition this month. Historyextra.com/podcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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It all started long before a hurricane named Katrina.
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Politics, diplomacy, revolution and mutiny take center stage at the start of this episode, but mud, blood, shells and tragedy drown all by the end.
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From Biblical-era coup conspiracies to the horrific aftermath of ancient combat this second installment of the series on the Kings of Achaemenid Persia goes where only Dan can take it. For better or worse…
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The Final of the Java series. East Java falls and what is left of the Java Allied Defense is trapped in the south at Tjilatjap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Tensions reached a climax in the freezing winter of 1787, as Daniel Shays and 1,500 rebel soldiers stormed the federal arsenal in Springfield, Massachusetts. The rebels hoped to seize arms and ammunition and burn Boston to the ground. What they didn’t know was that a government army awaited them, setting off a dogged chase in the winter snow that lasted weeks. The farmers’ revolt reverberated far beyond Massachusetts. Shays’s Rebellion stunned America’s political elite, even drawing a horrified George Washington out of retirement to return to public life. The uprising helped convince the nation’s power brokers to throw out the Articles of Confederation and devise a new Constitution. They were determined to create a strong federal government, one that they hoped could withstand domestic rebellion. But their efforts sparked a bitter dispute about the role of government in the new Republic. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Sleep Number - Discover the Sleep Number 360 smart bed for proven quality sleep. It senses your movements and automatically adjusts to keep you effortlessly comfortable. Only at a Sleep Number storeor sleepnumber.com/TELLERS. Scotts - With Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action, you can finally get the lawn you’ve always dreamt of at scotts.com.
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Mike tells Sarah about a dying industry, a dangerous car and the Pulitzer Prize-winning article that misrepresented them both. Digressions include “Mission Impossible,” “Friday the 13th” and the naming conventions of academic articles. This episode contains a larger-than-usual number of dad jokes and a shocking revelation about Johnny Carson. Support us: patreon.com/yourewrongabout paypal.me/yourewrongabout https://www.teepublic.com/stores/youre-wrong-about?ref_id=10420 Continue reading →
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We like it when things go according to plan. Even when it comes to death, we long to have some semblance of control over our path. So when those best-laid plans are disrupted by the unexpected, it’s only natural to assume the worst. * * * This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Harry’s: You deserve a great shave at a fair price. Get your free starter kit delivered straight to your door, which includes a weighted razor handle, moisturizing shave gel, a precision-engineered 5-blade cartridge, and a handy travel cover. Visit Harrys.com/lore to get yours today. SimpliSafe: Secure your home with 24/7 professional monitoring for just $15 a month. Visit SimpliSafe.com/Lore today, and you’ll get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial. Squarespace: If you're passionate about it, show it off. Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support Build your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. Episode Resources: Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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It’s April 7th. Jody Avirgan and Nicole Hemmer discuss the scandal that erupted after candidate Barack Obama made comments at a fundraiser ahead of the Pennsylvania primary. His remarks about “bitter” voters who “cling to guns and religion,” and the controversy that erupted, in many ways previewed the politics of the next decade. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod
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Born between 1428-1431, Vlad the Impaler was abandoned by his father as a boy and betrayed by everyone he trusted. He channeled his resentment into an unquenchable lust for power and violence—eventually becoming the ruler of Wallachia.
76
Johanna Katrin Fridriksdottir explores what everyday life was like for women in Norse society, the opportunities available to them and the challenges they faced. Historyextra.com/podcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
77
Pettenkofer's ideas about how cholera spread weren’t exactly right, but they still had really beneficial impacts on the way we live. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
78
Genetics has radically transformed our understanding of prehistory over the past two decades, revealing everything from the existence of brand-new, unknown species to interbreeding between Neanderthals and our human ancestors. I talked to geneticists Spencer Wells and Razib Khan, two of the world's most knowledgable communicators on genetics and prehistory, to get a sense for how things have changed.
79
Following the Bay of Pigs disaster, and a second crisis in Europe resulting in the deadly grey reality of the Berlin Wall, an over-confident Nikita Khrushchev decides to further test what the Soviets see as a weak and vacillating Kennedy administration. As US reconnaissance overflights of Cuba resume after a hiatus following the events at Playa Giron, analysts are shocked to discover rings of Russian-made surface-to-air missile installations. While these themselves pose no threat to the United States, the installations follow the classic designs used by the Soviets to protect important ground installations. Then they see them: Russian medium-range, nuclear-tipped missiles capable of striking the entire East Coast. More are on the way from Russia, lashed to the decks of Soviet transports. Announcing an outright blockade of Cuba would be recognized as an act of war, so President Kennedy employs the Soviet tactic of linguistic sophistry and announces a "quarantine zone." As US Navy warships move to intercept the incoming missiles, the fate of the world hangs in the balance -- and is ultimately in the hands of a single man, not in either the White House or the Kremlin, but deep beneath the waves at the edge of the quarantine zone.
80
Sarah describes the spark that ignited the Satanic Panic. Our setting is a therapist’s office in 1976 Victoria, B.C., and our digressions include Sybil, scary paperbacks from the 80s and shouting "Fire!" on a crowded theater. This episode describes child abuse. patreon.com/yourewrongabout paypal.me/yourewrongabout https://www.teepublic.com/stores/youre-wrong-about?ref_id=10420 Continue reading →
81
If this were a movie, the events and cameos would be too numerous and star-studded to mention. It includes Xerxes, Spartans, Immortals, Alexander the Great, scythed chariots, and several of the greatest battles in history.
82
You sick f*cks asked, for it, so we're covering Sarah and Jennifer Hart, who fostered 6 children and then one day committed an unthinkable murder-suicide, driving themselves and their children off a cliff. It's truly a, shall we say, hartbreaking case.
83
The conflict between Israel and Palestine can often seem like a permanent feature of the global order. The wars, intifadas, refugees camps, suicide vests, UN resolutions, and peace talks have been painfully burned into our collective consciousness. But how could this have happened? Was it always this way? That’s what we’ll seek to find out in this three-part series on the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In Episode #1, nations are rallying to throw off the yoke of the Great Powers, and demanding the sovereign right to rule their homelands. A group calling themselves Zionists puts out a call to awaken the oppressed Jews of Europe from their thousand-year slumber. The time had come, after two thousand years of homeless wandering, to return to Palestine, the land longed for in so many psalms and lamentations. But there was a problem. While the Jews were in exile, another people had moved into the land, and they had been living there for 1300 years. Click here to listen on iTunes Or here for Stitcher! Oh, and a review would be appreciated! Thanks for listening. I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section or via e-mail. Part Two of this series will be along shortly, and I encourage you to subscribe so you’ll be the first to know. Enjoy!
84
The Americans are coming, but will the war be over by the time they get there? Germany throws everything into a last series of stupendous attacks in the West while hoping to avoid getting burned by a fire in the East they helped fan.
85
Benjamin Harrison, the Centennial President, survives a deadly strike, an international conflict, and the massacre at Wounded Knee. On the campaign trail, Harrison fights to overcome these obstacles and get the best of not one, but two challengers: former Democrat President Grover Cleveland and James Weaver of the Populist Party. During his campaign for re-election, Harrison’s prospects are further threatened by the death of a loved one. Created, hosted and executive produced by Lindsay Graham for Airship. Sound design by Derek Behrens. Co-Executive produced by Steven Walters in association with Ritual Productions. Written and researched by Cielle Salazar. Fact checking by Gregory Jackson and Cielle Salazar from the podcast History That Doesn’t Suck. Music by Lindsay Graham. If you like this show, please support it! Become a subscriber at www.wickedgamepodcast.com.
86
The human tendency to study the unknown—to dig deep and search for the bedrock of truth at the bottom of the mystery—is one of our most enduring qualities. But while that tenacity has helped scientists unlock much of our world, it has also led us to unusual ideas. And you’d be surprised what they recorded about it. * * * Episode Sponsors: SimpliSafe: Secure your home with 24/7 professional monitoring for just $15 a month. Visit SimpliSafe.com/Lore today, and you’ll get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial. Squarespace: If you're passionate about it, show it off. Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support Build your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. HelloFresh: Save time and frustration, and get delicious, healthy, honest meals delivered straight to your door, with all the instructions and ingredients prepped and ready to go. So go today to HelloFresh.com/lore10 and use code LORE10 during HelloFresh’s New Year’s sale, for 10 free meals, including free shipping. * * * Lore Resources: Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
87
The coronavirus outbreak and the global response to it is unprecedented. How did we get here? What comes next? Author Steven Johnson is an authority on the epidemics of the past, and how lessons that humanity learned decades ago might help us fight a pandemic in our present. Every week on Fighting Coronavirus, Steven will talk to experts in health and technology about ways innovations and interventions can help bring the current crisis to an end. Each episode will keep you up to date on the cutting edge scientific breakthroughs being used to tackle this global crisis. Listen to Fighting Coronavirus now: wondery.fm/tidesofhistoryFC.
88
Fred Armisen joins Mo to pay tribute to legendary bandleader and TV host, Lawrence Welk. Welk was another victim of television's Rural Purge of the early 1970s, when his long running musical variety show was canceled by ABC after his audience was deemed too old. But Welk did not go quietly. He defied the critics, bringing his show back to life on his own terms - and reaching an even wider audience.
89
Surprises come in all shapes and sizes, but the most surprising things in the world tend to be people. Today we'll introduce you to a couple of them.
90
EPISODE 316 What happens when P. T. Barnum, America's savviest supplier of both humbug and hoax, decides it's time to go legit? Only one of the greatest concert tours in American history. If you've seen the film musical The Greatest Showman, you've been introduced to Jenny Lind, the opera superstar dubbed "The Swedish Nightingale". And you also know that Barnum, taken with the Swedish songstress, brings her to New York to begin a heavily promoted American debut. But the film sidesteps many of the more fascinating details. Lind was greeted like a queen and rock star when she arrived at the Canal Street dock despite most New Yorkers having never heard her sing. Her stage was Castle Garden, the former fort turned performance venue that sat in New York harbor, connected to the Battery by a small bridge. The concert proved legendary. And Lind proved herself an enterprising businesswoman, bending even the will of a profiteer like Barnum. Her financial arrangement for the tour would influence 170 years of musical performances and cement her reputation as one of the greatest vocalists of the 19th century. Support the show.
91
Dr. Sidney Gottlieb ran the CIA's mind control program up until the 1970s without the public's knowledge. He may have even ordered hits on his employees to keep the project under wraps. But some still believe sub-projects under MKUltra's heading may have gone on to thrive...
92
What happens if human beings can't handle the power of their own weaponry? This show  examines the dangerous early years of the Nuclear Age and humankind's efforts to avoid self-destruction at the hands of its own creation.
93
In which we evaluate John Buford's performance in carrying out his covering force action on the morning of July 1, 1863 outside Gettysburg.
94
In this bonus episode, we explore several words and phrases that appeared for the first time in the first half of the 15th century, including “turnpike,” “to curry favor,” “budget,” “average,” “peculiar,” and “hogwash.”
95
Pain is at the root of most drama and entertainment. When does it get too real? This very disturbing and graphic show looks into some case studies and asks some deep questions. WARNING Very intense subject matter.
96
This week in the second of a two part program we hear from Jefferson Hour listeners from around the country about how the coronavirus is affecting them and their communities.
97
Episode 134: Disturbing the Peace There’s nothing more certain in life than death. No matter how rewarding or challenging our days on this planet might be, for as long as humans have been around, we’ve viewed death as something akin to slumber, however natural or untimely it might be. But not all that sleep are left undisturbed. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: We’ll always get the future wrong, so you better get life insurance right. Policygenius makes finding the right life insurance a breeze, and could save $1500 or more per year. Find your best price and apply online at Policygenius.com.  The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: A Historian Goes to the Movies: Ancient Rome. Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, which includes free postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE. ———————— Episode Resources: Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
98
Genghis Khan, Napoleon, Archduke Ferdinand, Hitler, Atomic bombs, Japanese numbers, Butterflies and Hurricanes
99
In which the Great White North is serviced and explored by the greatest bush plane of all time, and Ken decides that aircraft shouldn't be named after bugs. Certificate #35435.
100
A trial leads to murder. A relationship between a Hatfield young man and a McCoy young woman deepens the divide between the two families. And Devil Anse Hatfield makes new enemies who join the McCoy side of the feud. For more details, please visit www.blackbarrelmedia.com. Our social media pages are: @blackbarrelmedia on Facebook and Instagram, and @bbarrelmedia on Twitter.
101
April 5, 1918. The first mention of a new influenza outbreak in Kansas appears in a public health report. That strain, later called the Spanish Flu, would go on to kill at least 50 million people worldwide. In a time before widespread global travel, how did this disease spread so far, so fast? And what does it teach us about fighting pandemics today? Special thanks to Dr. Jeremy Brown, author of Influenza: The 100-Year Hunt to Cure the Deadliest Disease in History. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
102
Between 1854 and 1929, 250,000 orphans - at peril in the dangerous, overcrowded streets of New York - were placed on trains and sent west to live with new families. A desperate solution to a desperate problem, some of the stories turned out well and some far from well. The bond between the riders lives on in their descendants, many of whom continue to search for answers about their ancestry. Mo talks to the daughter of a rider, plumbs the CBS News archives for voices of the riders themselves, and tracks down the last survivor.
103
During the height of the Cold War, the United States scrambled to compete with the Soviets. As paranoia over espionage and mind control festered, the C.I.A. decided to create their own "Special Interrogation" Program that inevitably led to testing hallucinatory drugs on unwitting American Civilians.
104
In the 1960s, Lenny Bruce was a trailblazing standup comedian who took aim at American culture. Bruce clashed frequently with law enforcement, but his decisive legal battle began in 1964. Bruce faced obscenity charges over one of his performances. He also faced a criminal-justice system bent on silencing an outspoken social critic. Support us by supporting our sponsors!
105
In the final chapter of our series on the D.C. sniper attacks, Mike finally tells Sarah about the D.C. sniper attacks. Digressions include “The Abyss,” Ed Rooney and Jack the Ripper. We begin the episode with an update on our quarantine plans. Sarah misremembers the name of the TV show she was on. patreon.com/yourewrongabout paypal.me/yourewrongabout https://www.teepublic.com/stores/youre-wrong-about?ref_id=10420 Continue reading →
106
He had grown up a rich kid, believe it or not: the illegitimate son of a millionaire planter and a servant girl half his age. He was named "Truth," he was handsome and rugged, a 6'3" charismatic giant who had arrived back on his native shore with Che Guevara and handful of men on a leaky tub named "Granma." He faced off against Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush Jr, Obama and lived to see the election of Donald Trump. His name was Fidel Castro, and he brought communism to the Western Hemisphere. He would turn his native Cuba into a launching pad for Soviet nuclear missiles, a mere 90 miles south of the Florida keys. He would impoverish his nation for six decades and die with $900,000,000 in his personal bank account. And his first and greatest test would be to repel an American-backed invasion at Playa Giron, a beach on the southern coast of Cuba at the mouth of an inlet called the Bay of Pigs.
107
Join Parcast and Crime Junkie’s Ashley Flowers as they dive deep into the strange and surreal to explain some of the world’s most bizarre true crime occurrences in the new series, Supernatural with Ashley Flowers. Every Wednesday, Ashley digs into a different mystifying crime—where the most fitting theory isn’t always the most conventional. Was there a special committee formed under President Truman to recover and investigate alien spacecraft? Sort through the details with Ashley and decide for yourself in this exclusive clip from our episode on the “Majestic 12.” To finish this episode, subscribe to Supernatural with Ashley Flowers free on Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts!
108
In New Orleans, the disaster wasn’t the hurricane. The disaster was what happened after.
109
How could the levees have failed?
110
In light of current events, we are re-posting one of my favorite episodes (from December, 2017) on natural disasters and the fall of the Roman Empire. Justinian was the last great Roman emperor, but his reign was plagued by disasters beyond his control: volcanic eruptions, a changing climate, and a plague of epic proportions. Those disasters created a turning point that we can, with good reason, call the end of the Roman Empire.
111
Today we climb into the cockpit for a strange flight, and then get down in the dirt for an amazing discovery.
112
Holly and Tracy discuss the advance casualness of recording entirely from home, as well as Max von Pettenkofer's psyche, and the fairly recent rise of the poison control hotline. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
113
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the craze for gin in Britain in the mid-18th Century and the attempts to control it. With the arrival of William of Orange, it became an act of loyalty to drink Protestant, Dutch gin rather than Catholic brandy, and changes in tariffs made everyday beer less affordable. Within a short time, production increased and large sections of the population that had rarely or never drunk spirits before were consuming two pints of gin a week. As Hogarth indicated in his print Beer Street and Gin Lane (1751) in support of the Gin Act, the damage was severe, and addiction to gin was blamed for much of the crime in cities such as London. With Angela McShane Research Fellow in History at the Victoria and Albert Museum and University of Sheffield Judith Hawley Professor of 18th Century literature at Royal Holloway, University of London Emma Major Senior Lecturer in English at the University of York Producer: Simon Tillotson First broadcast 15 December 2016.
114
Catherine of Aragon was Henry VIII's first wife.
115
In 2017 we covered the offbeat life of Marchesa Luisa Casati. While many have admired heiress Casati over the years for her life led entirely based on her aesthetics, she was also entirely self-serving. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
116
In the early 1400s, playing cards made their first appearance in England. Those cards provide evidence of an early form of printing, but it would take another generation for Johannes Gutenberg to invent the printing press. In this episode we … Continue reading →
117
A hero arrives. But not the one everyone expected.
118
In the past few weeks Delhi has become the latest place in India convulsed with religious violence as Hindu mobs burned Muslim neighborhoods, mosques and killed over 40 people. The violence comes in the wake of a new citizenship law that excludes undocumented Muslims, but it also follows years of incendiary rhetoric and policies from the ascendant right-wing Hindu nationalist party, the BJP, and India's Prime Minister, Narendra Modi. As the political philosophy of Hindu nationalism gains ground in India we look back at one of its architects - Vinayak Savarkar.
119
Business Wars digs deep into some of the greatest corporate rivalries of all time. Think Facebook VS Snapchat or Nike VS Adidas. On each episode we give you an inside look at what inspired entrepreneurs to take risks that drove their companies to new heights -- or into the ground. In this season "Starbucks VS Dunkin" they follow these two java giants in a war that started brewing in the 1950s and is now hotter than ever. Coffee is a 100 billion dollar plus global industry with these two duking it out at the top, but their battle is about more than coffee. For the full episode go to: wondery.fm/ahtBW
121
That time everyone stayed home from work.  Sponsor: audible.com/revolutions. 
122
The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was founded in 1943, and it went on for years after WWII. These women were athletes, some of whom thought they were starting on a career in professional baseball. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
123
In fall 2017, we talked about a strange cultural phenomenon. For a brief window from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, people in the United States were watching train wrecks for fun. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
124
A universe of rumor and misinformation plays out on television.
125
Imagine you're working in a field in the tiny community of 12th-century Woolpit, England, and encounter two green-skinned children with no knowledge of your language, a strangely specific diet, and a mystifying origin story. What would you do? Join the guys as they explore the strange story of the mysterious 'Green Children' of Woolpit, England, separating fact from folklore in an attempt to discern the truth at the heart of the myth. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
126
We all love a good hiding place. Whether it’s the child who tucks the key to their diary under their pillow, or the parent who hides away the holiday gifts, humans have proven themselves to be fond of secret places. But if the stories are any indication, there’s one place in England that was better than most at doing what we love. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Casper: Discover Casper’s new Hybrid mattress, which combines the pressure relief of their award-winning foam with durable-yet-gentle springs. Try it for 100 nights—risk-free—in your own home. Visit Casper.com/Lore to get $100 toward select mattresses by using the offer code LORE. Terms and conditions apply. SimpliSafe: Secure your home with 24/7 professional monitoring for just $15 a month. Visit SimpliSafe.com/Lore today, and you’ll get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial. Wellington: The 1st issue of the Lore-inspired comic book series, Wellington, has finally arrived. You can buy issues of the comic book online, in person at your local comic book shop, or even digital copies through Comixology. Grab your copy today, and buckle up for a dark adventure! ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
127
Back in 2014, we tackled SPAM's story. This famous Hormel Foods product was invented in the 1930s to make use of a surplus of shoulder meat from pigs. It played a huge role in WWII, and shaped the cuisines of many Pacific Island nations. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
128
In October 2017, we talked about mysterious prints that looked like hoof marks appeared all over the English seaside county of Devon in February 1855. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
129
We all love a good museum, but how long have we had them? In this episode of Invention, Robert and Joe discuss just what a museum actually is and when the concept seems to have entered human civilization. (7/1/2019) Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
130
The American Revolution inspired revolutions in France, the Caribbean, and in Latin and South America between the late 18th and mid-19th centuries. Naturally, Spanish and Portuguese American revolutionaries turned to the United States for assistance with their fights. How did Americans in the United States respond to these calls for assistance? What did they make of these other “American Revolutions?” Caitlin Fitz, an Associate Professor of History at Northwestern University and the author of Our Sister Republics: The United States in an Age of American Revolutions, helps us investigate answers to these questions. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/090   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 115: Andrew Torget, The Early History of Texas Episode 124: James Alexander Dun, Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America Episode 163: The American Revolution in North America Episode 164: The American Revolution in the Age of Revolutions Episode 165: The Age of Revolutions Episode 178: Karoline Cook, Muslims & Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America Listen! Apple Podcasts  Spotify  Google Podcasts  Ben Franklin's World iOS App  Ben Franklin's World Android App  Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group  Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page  Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter 
131
When Alexander Severus leads the Roman armies east, he meets Artaxerxes and the Sasanians in battle but his tactics are unprepared. Artaxerxes attacked unexpectedly with his entire force and trapped the Romans like fish in a net; firing their arrows from all sides at the encircled soldiers, the Persians massacred the whole army. Guest: Dr Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)
132
In this 2010 episode, previous hosts Sarah and Deblina trace the life of Tagore through his childhood to knighthood and beyond. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
133
Zanzibar is a relatively tiny place, but its place in history is significant, largely because of its geographical position. Its value as a trading port led it, over time, to be the location of what’s often called the shortest war in history.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
134
This week Loren and Erin talk their way through all the coronavirus feelings: fear, hope, gratitude, some minor policy questions, and the pop culture that's giving us life. Stay home, be safe, wash your hands.
135
While the ocean represents opportunity and hope to a lot of people, it also holds more mystery than most of feel comfortable with. Yes, we’ve explored it in search of new lands and discoveries, but we’ve also lost so much in the process. Amazingly, though, some things that are lost occasionally return. * * * This episode of Lore was sponsored by: The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: The Real History of Secret Societies. Audible: Audible is offering our listeners a free audiobook with a 30-day trial membership. Just browse the unmatched selection of audio programs, download a free title, and start listening—it’s that easy. To get started today, just visit Audible.com/lore or text “LORE” to 500-500. Squarespace: If you're passionate about it, show it off. Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support Build your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. * * * Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
136
On the 75th anniversary of the battle of Okinawa, historian Saul David revisits one of the bloodiest clashes of the Pacific War and explains how it played a crucial part in the United States’ decision to use atomic weapons against Japan. Historyextra.com/podcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
137
Peter's latest spot of tourism takes him to Melbourne. As a huge sports fan, he is used to listening on his crackly radio to cricket commentaries. So he heads to the Melbourne cricket ground, as a first stop. In the spirit of the Ashes, he went with David, another blind cricket nut and a native of the city. His next stop is Melbourne’s version of the golden mile, where Peter indulged another obsession - funfairs. But the real joy of Melbourne is the outdoors, and the delight of wandering around with a microphone chatting to people.
138
This offbeat 2015 episode covers a series of 1835 news articles about some utterly mind-blowing discoveries made by Sir John Herschel about the lunar surface. The serial had everything: moon poppies, goat-like unicorns, lunar beavers and even bat people. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
139
Greg Jenner is joined by historian Dr Mehreen Chida-Razvi and comedian Sindhu Vee to explore The Mughal Empire and it’s legacy in art and architecture. We learn why an Emperor always needed to be wary of his siblings, how a zebra came to cause disbelief in court, and we hear the real story behind the wondrous Taj Mahal.
140
On this episode of BackStory, Ed and Brian explore the history of the wellness industry in the U.S.
141
The world's first webcam went online in 1993. Its camera was focused on a coffee pot so that computer scientists in Cambridge, in the UK, could see if there was any coffee available. Dr Quentin Stafford-Fraser, Martyn Johnson and Paul Jardetzky explained to Rebecca Kesby how they developed it. This programme is a rebroadcast (Photo: some of the original images of the coffeepot)
142
Lenny Bruce faces a terrifying moment, when his health takes a sudden downturn. But a recent Supreme Court case lifts his spirits, and raises the prospects that he'll triumph over his own legal troubles. The trial winds down, and soon, the verdict is in. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Worthy - Get up to twice as much for your jewelry when you sell with Worthy. Just go to worthy.com/AS to get started.
143
John Wilkes Booth assassinates the first president in American history on Good Friday, April 14, 1865. At the same time, Lewis Powell savagely attacks the Secretary of State. Washington City turns into chaos as people pour into the streets and exchange  nightmarish rumors. And the largest manhunt in U.S. history begins. For more details, please visit www.blackbarrelmedia.com. Our social media pages are: @blackbarrelmedia on Facebook and Instagram, and @bbarrelmedia on Twitter.
144
The longer humans stay in one place, the more progress and community we seem to create. But at the same time, we bring our darkness with us, and over time it begins to stain a place with shadows of pain and tragedy. And the older the city, the darker the mark. This episode of Lore was sponsored by: The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: A History of England: From the Tudors to the Stuarts. Squarespace: If you're passionate about it, show it off. Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support Build your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. Fracture: Fracture wants to change the way you think about printing your photos. Instead of using paper, Fracture prints directly onto glass, and your photos have never looked better. Get 15% off your first order today at FractureMe.com/LORE, using the offer code LORE15. Show Resources Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
145
In the years after World War II, Dwight David Eisenhower was arguably the most popular man on the planet. Ike’s prestige was so immense that in 1948, President Harry S Truman offered him the top slot on the 1948 Democratic ticket, with the offer to revert to his former position as Vice President under Eisenhower. It wasn’t enough.  But by 1952, a Draft Eisenhower committee threw an enormous rally: thousands of screaming fans, movie stars, and Irving Berlin himself leading the crowd in a rendition of God Bless America… all of this for a man who wasn’t even there. Finally persuaded, General Eisenhower became President Eisenhower, facing a brace of unknown Soviet leaders named Malenkov and Khrushchev. But no one — not even those who had so strongly lobbied for him — were prepared for the anti-military, anti-war statements and policies from the man who had been assumed to be the fiercest of Cold Warriors.
146
They say that history is written by the winners. While it's a trite cliché, there might be some truth in it. It's especially true when examining a figure like the Celtic-British freedom fighter Boudica. In 60 AD Boudica led her people in a violent revolt against the Roman Empire. Unfortunately everything we know about her was written by Romans. What should we believe? Tune in and find out how Winston Churchill, the end of the earth, and tiny bean sized meals all play a roll in the story! 
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In light of growing concerns about the coronavirus, we’re revisiting an episode we ran last spring.  One hundred years ago, the Spanish flu pandemic forever reshaped the way the United States responds to public health crises. At a time when people around the world were already dying on an unprecedented scale due to World War I, Spanish flu devastated American cities, killing more than 675,000 people in the U.S. alone. The virus had a profound effect on impact on medicine, politics, and the media, revealing deep flaws in the U.S. government’s ability to respond to such a disaster. But it would also lead to the creation of new public health institutions that still endure today, and it would help usher in a new era of global collaboration in the medical community. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Quip - Go to GETQUIP.com/TELLERS, RIGHT NOW, you’ll get your first refill FREE. ZipRecruiter - To try ZipRecruiter FOR FREE, go to ZipRecruiter.com/aht
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In a Mobits first, Mo takes the show on the road! Mo shares his love of obituaries; investigates why we confuse certain dead celebrities; and interviews former New York Times obituary writer Margalit Fox about what it's like to write about the dead for a living. This episode was recorded in Asbury Park, NJ and Fairfield, CT.
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Before cell phones and internet access, learning about the world around us took a lot of time. Along the way, there would be gaps in our knowledge—holes that human cultures tended to fill with folklore. And while the creatures they invented to fill those gaps were amazing, it’s how close they often got to reality that makes those stories truly frightening. This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Bombas: Get your hands on the best socks your feet have ever experienced, and Bombas will donate a pair to a person in need. Save 20% on your first purchase when you shop at Bombas.com/LORE. Casper: Discover Casper’s new Hybrid mattress, which combines the pressure relief of their award-winning foam with durable-yet-gentle springs. Try it for 100 nights—risk-free—in your own home. Visit Casper.com/Lore to get $100 toward select mattresses by using the offer code LORE. Terms and conditions apply. Fracture: Fracture wants to change the way you think about printing your photos. Instead of using paper, Fracture prints directly onto glass, and your photos have never looked better. Get 15% off your first order today at FractureMe.com/LORE, using the offer code LORE15. Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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In 2015, we talked about Franz Liszt, who was a pianist, a composer and a conductor, and basically the first rock star who drove fans into fits of swooning and screaming. Some fans even stole the detritus of his life (unfinished coffee, broken piano strings) to carry with them. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
151
Water, like history, repeats itself.
152
A nameless man who wanted no attention, and a hungry celebrity who wanted too much of it. Both are on display today in the Cabinet.
153
The St. Louis Blues hockey team had the worst record in the NHL in January 2019, before deciding to adopt the 1982 hit song Gloria as their anthem. They ended up winning the Stanley Cup. But many of their fans didn't even know that the woman who sang that song had died back in 2004. Mo talks to Laura Branigan's brother, her high school best friend, songwriter Diane Warren (who wrote her first hit song for Branigan) and attends a reunion of fans to tell the poignant story of an undersung pop star whose voice lives on.
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At multiple, pivotal moments in the Cold War, Pepsi and Coke waged Cola wars all their own. The guys team up for the first episode of Ridiculous History: Quarantine. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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We continue out offbeat 2015 story. Once the effort to import hippos to the U.S. got the backing of a politician, two men with intertwined histories, Frederick Russel Burnham and Fritz Duquesne, were brought on board to serve as experts and advocates. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
156
America in the run-up to the Revolutionary War wasn't just a period of dramatic political change, it was also a time of great religious and social instability, anxiety and experimentation. And in the midst of it all there arose a self-proclaimed genderless prophet — the Public Universal Friend. This week, how the Public Universal Friend rocked society's norms and paved the way for others to reject religious and gender expectations for centuries to come.
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An offbeat episode from 2015: In 1910, the U.S. a meat shortage, and a water hyacinth overgrowth problem. The obvious solution to the dilemma: Import hippos from Africa. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
158
For many years ADHD was dismissed by sceptics as a dubious condition. Later, when it achieved recognition, if not acceptance, the focus was very much on the negative impact it had on the lives of people it affected and their close ones. As Saeedeh Hashemi - herself diagnosed with ADHD - will show, there is now increasing understanding that living with the condition also brings positives. Saeedeh will meet others who, for all the downsides of the disorder, feel that life without it would be like “living cramped within a frame” and who would not give it up as it has fundamentally shaped their personalities. She will also talk to top medical professionals to hear how they are seeking to recognise the positive potential of ADHD and what innovative ways of treating the condition they’re suggesting. The modern working environment has shifted and employers are finally embracing neuro-diversity as a vital tool in building effective teams. Saeedeh will explore what it actually means, how the thinking about workflow, work space and team work reflects the needs of people with the condition and allows them to grow to the best of their potential and to the benefit of business. The programme, of course, certainly won’t suggest that ADHD is entirely a gift. It will, however, seek to emphasise that alongside negatives come strengths and qualities that can help propel individuals to enormous personal success, and how society and businesses are beginning to see it as an opportunity rather than a disadvantage. This documentary is airing as part of Life Changes, a series of programmes and features across the BBC’s global TV, radio, social and online networks exploring the theme of change - how we change ourselves, our lives, and how we respond to changes in the world around us. Reporting from across the world - from Ethiopia, Korea, Rwanda and Paraguay to Egypt, the US and Russia – the documentaries and digital stories will cover a diverse range of topics, from sexuality to sustainability, from peace to war, and from neurodiversity to migration.
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Some places in our world have a dark legacy. Prior failures. Shameful acts. Painful tragedy. Even though it all took place long before we arrived there, we can still feel the tremors of that darkness—and the stories about their source are deeply chilling.* * *This episode of Lore was sponsored by:Away: Away creates thoughtful travel products designed to change how you see the world. Because getting Away means getting more out of every trip. For $20 off a suitcase, visit AwayTravel.com/LORE and use promo code LORE during checkout!Audible: Audible is offering our listeners a 30-day trial membership. Just browse the unmatched selection of audio programs, download a free title, and start listening—it’s that easy. To get started today, just visit Audible.com/lore or text “LORE” to 500-500.Squarespace: If you're passionate about it, show it off. Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support Build your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%.* * *Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/musicEpisode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sourcesLore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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It's a 2019 show about urine! Spoiler alert: Hennig Brand discovered phosphorous by boiling pee. But he was trying to do something else: He thought the secret to the philosopher’s stone might be found in urine.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
161
Theodore Roosevelt was a progressive policy setter, a conservationist and the 26th President of the Unites States. His early life struggles, and grandiose attitude drove him to implement his moral code to strengthen his country. Then depression brought him crashing down. Jump inside the mind of one of our most colorful Presidents. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
162
When you think you're out in the front of the pack, but really you're being lapped.   Sponsor: Harrys.com/revolutions
163
Six Degrees was the first online social network, allowing users to connect with their real-world contacts by creating a profile within a database. It was created by entrepreneur Andrew Weinreich. But Six Degrees never achieved the scale of later social networks like Facebook or MySpace, and Weinreich sold the site in 1999. He spoke to Lucy Burns.
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Most of our life is spent looking for things. Companionship, security, even our lost keys. But above all of that is our search for answers, and the way human beings have tried to find them has lead to all manner of frightening situations. * * * Episode Sponsors: SimpliSafe: Secure your home with 24/7 professional monitoring for just $15 a month. Visit SimpliSafe.com/LORE, and you’ll get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial. Casper: Discover Casper’s new Hybrid mattress, which combines the pressure relief of their award-winning foam with durable-yet-gentle springs. Try it for 100 nights—risk-free—in your own home. Visit Casper.com/Lore to get $100 toward select mattresses by using the offer code LORE. Terms and conditions apply. Fracture: Fracture wants to change the way you think about printing your photos. Instead of using paper, Fracture prints directly onto glass, and your photos have never looked better. Get 15% off your first order today at FractureMe.com/LORE, using the offer code LORE15. * * * Lore Resources Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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When the United States of America was founded, it was only a union of a small number of states. By the beginning of the 20th century, the United States had become an empire; with states and territories and colonies that spanned the globe. As a result, the country began to not only reconsider its place in the world, but also its very name.
166
In a 1917 dogfight, German flying ace Werner Voss took on seven of the best pilots in the Royal Flying Corps.
167
Stanley Tucci tells the story of Kathleen Cleaver, a leading light in the short-lived but highly influential Black Panther Party which was founded in Oakland, California. Kathleen Cleaver and the Panthers were sick of the compromises of the mainstream civil rights movement. Their militant approach influenced many other activists - including San Francisco's increasingly vocal LGBT community. But for the US government, the Panthers became public enemy number one - and leading figures like Cleaver were forced to flee. Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester Written and produced by Laurence Grissell
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In 1975 a group of Californian computer enthusiasts began meeting to share ideas. Among those who took part were the founders of Apple. In those days though, many of them were students or even high school kids. Mike Lanchin spoke to two early members of the group. This programme is a rebroadcast Photo: Former Homebrew member Len Shustek.
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Due to the unfortunate spread of COVID-19, Parcast has decided to halt recording for the time-being. This is a precautionary measure taken to ensure the safety of our hosts and staff. In the meantime, we're excited to share one of our classic episodes that we know you'll enjoy! In the 1700s, he was known as the “hungriest man in history.” Among other things, he could eat his way through corks, stones, live animals, and an entire basketful of apples one after the other. Was Tarrare meant to be a competitive eater, or was he the victim of a strange disorder?
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Although the entire Cold War passed without shots being fired between the two superpowers, the Cold War was anything but bloodless. The Korean conflict marked the beginning of proxy wars, regional conflicts backed by the full military might of both the United States and the Soviet Union. A brilliant amphibious landing turns the tide on the Korean Peninsula; meanwhile, America raises the stakes with a bomb so powerful it takes an atomic bomb to simply light the fuse.
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Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense, the pamphlet that inspired the American Revolution. So why did only six people show up at his funeral? Mo finds out why this essential Founding Father has never gotten his due - and, with the help of a Tony nominated Broadway songwriting team and The Daily Show's Lewis Black, stages a rollicking memorial service for Paine on the spot where he dropped dead.
172
Everyone wants to look good. And while there’s nothing wrong with beauty, sometimes people have made sacrifices—both willing and unaware—in the pursuit of it. After looking through the pages of history, though, that hasn’t always been a good thing.* * *This episode of Lore was sponsored by:Bombas: Get your hands on the best socks your feet have ever experienced, and Bombas will donate a pair to a person in need. Save 20% on your first purchase when you shop at Bombas.com/LORE.Fracture: Fracture wants to change the way you think about printing your photos. Instead of using paper, Fracture prints directly onto glass, and your photos have never looked better. Get 15% off your first order today at FractureMe.com/LORE, using the offer code LORE15.Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, and claim your $110 bonus offer, which includes postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE.* * *Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/musicEpisode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sourcesLore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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In a bonus Sunday episode, Marc Morris, author of an acclaimed history of the Norman Conquest, tackles some of the big questions about William the Conqueror and his followers, several of which were submitted by our listeners and social media fans. Historyextra.com/podcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Episode 127: Tipping the Scales If you flip through the pages of history long enough, you’ll eventually run into stories about life out of balance, and how something—fate or chance or something otherworldly—has stepped in to make it right. In fact, some of those stories have become a part of our modern popular culture—all despite the deadly stories at their center. This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Fracture: Fracture wants to change the way you think about printing your photos. Instead of using paper, Fracture prints directly onto glass, and your photos have never looked better. Get 15% off your first order today at FractureMe.com/LORE, using the offer code LORE15. The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: Warriors, Queens and Intellectuals: 36 Great Women before 1400. Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, and claim your $110 bonus offer, which includes postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE. Lore Resources Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources Lore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
175
It's amazing what people are capable. Those things aren't always good, or successful, but they are amazing nonetheless. Let's explore two of them today.
176
People try to come home. But does home want them anymore?
177
Executive Director, Chris Costa talks with Kirsten Fontenrose, current Director of the Scowcroft Middle East Security Initiative at the Atlantic Council, about current events in the Middle East and her twenty years of experience with the region.
178
SWAPCAST - On this episode I join Jeffrey Wilson and Pat Miletich on their podcast The Conspiracy Farm to chat about all the most modern Corona Virus shenanigans. We talk about origins; international policy; economic fluctuation among other things and we get into the weirdness going on in Hollywood and The White House around all this unprecedented activity. There is a little intro to this for a few minutes that explains a lot of stuff so I wont put it all here but just to let you know; a lot of the stuff we say is conjecture and it will definitely become clearer what is going on as time passes. Stay safe everyone and enjoy the SwapCast.You can watch the TCG LiveChat mentioned on Twitch at this link https://www.twitch.tv/videos/573543871You can find The Conspiracy Farm here:Website: https://theconspiracyfarm.com/Twitter: twitter.com/conspiracyfarm1Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5PYBGLd0cfl9kiir5dSD2EYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCawwco29rI2tHQ0TRVgNfWw
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Coronavirus Global Conversations is a place to talk about the impact of the disease.
180
In the early 1970's, CBS axed its slate of hit country-themed sitcoms. The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, and Petticoat Junction were just three of the shows that bought the farm. Mo talks to Linda Henning (star of Petticoat Junction), author Sara Eskridge and TV critic Alan Sepinwall about the sitcom slaughter.
181
On this day in 1905, anti-apartheid activist Helen Joseph was born. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
182
In light of current events, we are re-posting one of my favorite episodes (from June, 2018) on the Black Death. Between 1346 and 1351, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people - at least half the population - in Europe and the Middle East. This great mortality, one of the worst disasters of any era, fundamentally reshaped European society and set the stage for the world that followed.
183
In a programme first broadcast on 12 April 2018, Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the contribution of George Stephenson (1781-1848) and his son Robert (1803-59) to the development of the railways in the 19th Century. George became known as The Father of Railways and yet arguably Robert's contribution was even greater, with his engineering work going far beyond their collaboration. Robert is credited with the main role in the design of their locomotives. George had worked on stationary colliery steam engines and, with Robert, developed the moving steam engine Locomotion No1 for the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1825. They produced the Rocket for the Rainhill Trials on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1829. From there, the success of their designs and engineering led to the expansion of railways across Britain and around the world. with Dr Michael Bailey Railway historian and editor of the most recent biography of Robert Stephenson Julia Elton Past President of the Newcomen Society for the History of Engineering and Technology and Colin Divall Professor Emeritus of Railway Studies at the University of York Producer: Simon Tillotson This programme is a repeat.
184
Marilyn Monroe y su conocimiento acerca de OVNIS. ¿será que esto la llevó a la muerte? Acompáñanos a analizar toda la información.
185
Poison, swordplay and bloodshed. Shakespeare’s characters met their ends in a plethora of gruesome ways. But how realistic were they? And did they even shock audiences who lived in a time of plague, pestilence and public executions, a time when seeing a dead or dying body on the way home from the theatre were high. I was joined by the wonderful Dr Kathryn Harkup, a chemist and author, on a tumultuous journey through the most dramatic and memorable parts of Shakespeare’s work. For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, including our new in depth documentary about the bombing war featuring James Holland and other historians, please signup to www.HistoryHit.TV Use code 'pod1' at checkout for your first month free and the following month for just £/$1. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
186
Joseph Stalin, the architect and instigator of the 42-year Cold War, has died five years into the conflict. Across the Atlantic, a new Republican President, who had worked closely with Uncle Joe during World War II, is a mere two months in office. As the knives come out for the succession fight inside the Kremlin, will a brief window of opportunity be enough to completely reset the conflict?
187
To lead into discussing the discovery of insulin, today we have a history of diabetes and its treatment in the centuries before insulin was developed, including the starvation diets that were used in the years just before the discovery.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
188
In December of 1909, a few days before Christmas, the murder of a wealthy old woman in Glasgow sparked a cascade of events that would go on to write an incredible story of prejudice, conspiracy and eventual justice. Featuring a starring role by none other than the creator of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, it was then and remains still, one of the most fascinating, perplexing and straight confusing incidents of cause celebre in modern history.   SOURCES   Doyle, Arthur C. (1912) The Case of Oscar Slater. Leopold Classic Library. London, UK   Roughead, William. (1910) The Trial of Oscar Slater. William Hodge & Company, Glasgow, UK   Toughill, Thomas (2006) Oscar Slater: The Immortal Case of Sir Conan Doyle. The History Press, London, UK   Fox, Margalit. (2019) Conan Doyle for the Defence: A Sensational Murder, the Quest for Justice and the World's Greatest Detective Writer. Profile Books, London, UK.   ‘Glasgow West End Murder. Slater Trial Opened,’ Greenock Telegraph and Clyde Shipping Gazette, Greenock, 04 May 1909, P. 4.   ‘Glasgow Flat Tragedy. Slater On Trial,’ Greenock Telegraph and Clyde Shipping Gazette, Greenock, 05 May 1909, P. 4.   ‘The Slater Trial. Third Days Proceedings,’ Greenock Telegraph and Clyde Shipping Gazette, Greenock, 06 May 1909, P. 4.   ‘Glasgow West End Murder. Slater Found Guilty,’ Greenock Telegraph and Clyde Shipping Gazette, Greenock, 07 May 1909, P. 4.   ------ For extended show notes, including maps, links and scripts, head over to darkhistories.com Support the show by using our link when you sign up to Audible: http://audibletrial.com/darkhistories or visit our Patreon for bonus episodes and Early Access: https://www.patreon.com/darkhistories Connect with us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/darkhistoriespodcast Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/darkhistories & Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dark_histories/ Or you can contact us directly via email at contact@darkhistories.com or via voicemail on: (415) 286-5072 or join our Discord community: https://discord.gg/6f7e2pt Music was recorded by me © Ben Cutmore 2017 Other Outro music was Paul Whiteman & his orchestra with Mildred Bailey - All of me (1931). It's out of copyright now, but if you're interested, that was that.
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Everyone longs for someone. That special partner who can enter their life and make is something better, something more. And while dating has taken many forms over the years, nothing is like a good, old fashioned personal ad—or the people who took advantage of them.* * *This episode of Lore was sponsored by:HelloFresh: Save time and frustration, and get delicious, healthy, honest meals delivered straight to your door, with all the instructions and ingredients prepped and ready to go. Subscribe today at HelloFresh.com/LORE80, and be sure to use the offer code LORE80 to save $80 off your first month.Harry’s: You deserve a great shave at a fair price. Get your free starter kit delivered straight to your door, which includes a weighted razor handle, moisturizing shave cream, a precision-engineered 5-blade cartridge, and a handy travel cover. Visit Harrys.com/lore to get yours today.Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, and claim your $110 bonus offer, which includes postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE.* * *Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/musicEpisode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sourcesLore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
190
He was one of the most celebrated poets of his time. Throughout his lifetime, Walt Whitman would write down his musing in his notebooks. These were donated to the Library of Congress upon his death. But sometime in the 1940s...they vanished.
191
In which pre-Columbian civilizations spend thousands of years banging each other up with heavy rubber balls, and John tries to replace professional sports with stick-fighting. Certificate #28586.
192
How does trauma birth genius? Is it related to the mind's ability to heal itself or latent powers encoded in human DNA? Or possibly, is it evidence of past lives?
193
World War III — the Apocalypse that never was — started in the same place that World War II in Europe had ended: Berlin. “An Iron Curtain has descended across the Continent,” said Winston Churchill, and that curtain ran right through the heart of Berlin. One the Eastern side, the collectivist, state-centered world of Joseph Stalin's communist ideology, armed to the teeth with conventional forces. On the other side — the Western side — a war-weary alliance of capitalist countries, led by the beacon of individual rights, the United States.   In Part 1 of The Cold War: What We Saw, we will peel back the layers of mystery cloaking the terror state run by the Kremlin, and watch as America takes its first small steps onto the stage of world leadership.
194
The second part of this offbeat revisit! As the New York Sun's series of astonishing moon discoveries concluded, most people recognized that it was a hoax. But what made people buy into the tall tale in the first place? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
195
There were other stars as big as Audrey Hepburn, some even bigger. (Ahem, Katharine Hepburn?) So why is it that more than 25 years after her death her image still captivates us and her name trends regularly on social media? Mo explores why the attachment to Audrey is still so personal for so many people.Learn more about the Mobituaries book: http://bit.ly/MobituariesBook
196
Today, the border that divides Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland is "soft", in most places you could almost forget that it's there. But for decades it was a deadly flash point in the bitter conflict known as "The Troubles" . This week, we share an episode from Today, Explained that takes a look at the history of this conflict and how Brexit could jeopardize a fragile peace.
197
Holly and Tracy talk about aspects of Zanzibari culture that Holly had not considered prior to this week's episode, and Tracy's rewatch of "A League of Their Own." Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
198
EPISODE 315 The Hall of Fame for Great Americans, founded in 1900, was a precursor to the Nobel Prize and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, a vaunted tribute to those who have contributed greatly to the development the United States of America. Located on the campus of Bronx Community College in the University Heights neighborhood of the Bronx, the Hall of Fame features the sculpted bronze busts of 96 individuals considered worthy of renown in their day, arranged along a columned arcade designed by Stanford White. It was so important in the early 20th century that the Baseball Hall of Fame and the Hollywood Walk of Fame derive from its example. The Hall of Fame for Great Americans even pops up in The Wizard of Oz! But today it is virtually forgotten. And no person has been elected to the Hall of Fame since the 1970s. This is the story of a university with lofty intentions, a snapshot of early 20th century optimism, and a look at a few questionable considerations of 'greatness'. *There were once 98 busts but two were removed in 2017. boweryboyshistory.com Support the show.
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Characters on sitcoms aren't supposed to die. So when they do, it's never less than weird. Mo examines some of the most infamous sitcom deaths and disappearances with Henry Winkler, Sandy Duncan and Alan Sepinwall.Learn more about the Mobituaries book: http://bit.ly/MobituariesBook