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Today's classic from 2014 features Hetty Green. She was the wealthiest woman in the U.S., skilled when it came to amassing a fortune. But her eccentric behavior and miserly ways led to bad press and a less-than-flaterring nickname. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In this episode, we look at Puerto Rico's relationship with the mainland U.S. and the key figures who shaped the island's fate.
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The planet hadn't seen a major war between all the Great Powers since the downfall of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. But 99 years later the dam breaks and a Pandora's Box of violence engulfs the planet.
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The Asia-Pacific War of 1937-1945 has deep roots. It also involves a Japanese society that's been called one of the most distinctive on Earth. If there were a Japanese version of Captain America, this would be his origin story.
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She was the Spanish empire’s most widely published poet of her time, and her work has survived until today, but not her own thoughts about much of her life. Consequently, her life, and her very complex poetry, has been really subject to interpretation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia, a collective of independently owned and operated podcasts. A note on shownotes. In a perfect world, you go into each episode of the Memory Palace knowing nothing about what's coming. It's pretentious, sure, but that's the intention. So, if you don't want any spoilers or anything, you can click play without reading ahead. Anyway... Music  We start with the Opening of Craig Armstrong's score to Far From the Madding Crowd. Glass Houses no. 13 from Ann Southern. Earring from Julia Wolf. Occam II for Violin from Eliane Radigue. Rearranging Furniture from Gabriel Yared's score to By the Sea. A bit of Movement II from Martynov, "Come in!" by Vladimir Martynov. Notes Plenty written about the Willie D.. I found Roger Branfill-Cook's Torpedo: the Most Revolutionary Weapon in Naval History to be particularly useful. I also enjoyed stumbling upon this day-by-day breakdown of F.D.R.'s Presidency.
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Julius Caesar is our travel guide as he takes us through his murderous subjugation of the native Celtic tribal peoples of ancient Gaul. It sounds vaguely like other, recent European colonial conquests...until the natives nearly win.
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Deep themes run through this show, with allegations of Japanese war crimes and atrocities in China at the start leading to eerily familiar, almost modern questions over how the world should respond. And then Dec 7, 1941 arrives...
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When King George IV died, his obituary in The Times read: “There never was an individual less regretted by his fellow-creatures than this deceased king." But even George IV once fell in love. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
10
Today's tour will give us all a chance to enjoy some music and a good book. But the experience won't be what you expect it to be.
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Often relegated to the role of slavish cannon fodder for Sparta's spears, the Achaemenid Persian empire had a glorious heritage. Under a single king they created the greatest empire the world had ever seen.
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Home might very well be what you make it, but it’s not always about beautiful decorations and comfortable furnishings. Sometimes the places we live take on elements of our own personality. Even after we’ve moved on, those pieces remain behind, like echoes of another time—echoes that can still be felt today.* * *This episode of Lore was sponsored by:Casper: Discover Casper’s new Hybrid mattress, which combines the pressure relief of their award-winning foam with durable-yet-gentle springs. Try it for 100 nights—risk-free—in your own home. Visit Casper.com/Lore to get $100 toward select mattresses by using the offer code LORE. Terms and conditions apply.The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature.Stamps.com: Print your own postage and shipping labels from your home or office. Start your 4-week trial today, and claim your $110 bonus offer, which includes postage, a digital scale, and zero commitment. Just visit Stamps.com, click on the microphone in the top-right of the homepage, and type LORE.* * *Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/musicEpisode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sourcesLore News: www.theworldoflore.com/now
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Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how, in September 1812, Napoleon captured Moscow and waited a month for the Russians to meet him, to surrender and why, to his dismay, no-one came. Soon his triumph was revealed as a great defeat; winter was coming, supplies were low; he ordered his Grande Armée of six hundred thousand to retreat and, by the time he crossed back over the border, desertion, disease, capture, Cossacks and cold had reduced that to twenty thousand. Napoleon had shown his weakness; his Prussian allies changed sides and, within eighteen months they, the Russians and Austrians had captured Paris and the Emperor was exiled to Elba. With Janet Hartley Professor Emeritus of International History, LSE Michael Rowe Reader in European History, King’s College London And Michael Rapport Reader in Modern European History, University of Glasgow Producer: Simon Tillotson
14
The Great Powers all come out swinging in the first round of the worst war the planet has ever seen. Millions of men in dozens of armies vie in the most deadly and complex opening moves of any conflict in world history.
15
The story of World War Two is usually told in terms of heroism on the battlefield, but perhaps the most important struggle was the economic battle. Across the world countries were fighting to feed their populations, maximise production from their factories and fund their armies. To mark the 80th anniversary of the start of World War Two, economist Duncan Weldon examines how the economies of the European powers, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and the Soviet Union, set the scene for the conduct of the war in 1939 and 1940.
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The war of maneuver that was supposed to be over quickly instead turns into a lingering bloody stalemate. Trench warfare begins, and with it, all the murderous efforts on both sides to overcome the static defenses.
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What happens if human beings can't handle the power of their own weaponry? This show  examines the dangerous early years of the Nuclear Age and humankind's efforts to avoid self-destruction at the hands of its own creation.
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The Americans are coming, but will the war be over by the time they get there? Germany throws everything into a last series of stupendous attacks in the West while hoping to avoid getting burned by a fire in the East they helped fan.
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Machine guns, barbed wire and millions upon millions of artillery shells create industrialized meat grinders at Verdun and the Somme. There's never been a human experience like it and it changes a generation.
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Politics, diplomacy, revolution and mutiny take center stage at the start of this episode, but mud, blood, shells and tragedy drown all by the end.
21
Baseball’s progression from an amateur activity to a professional sport is full of great stories. Hear about the myths and legends of early baseball; the pioneers and the inventors; the moguls and the superstars. And the gamblers. It all leads to the formation of 1919 Chicago White Sox and sets in motion the elements of one of the most infamous scandals in baseball history. Special thanks to the SABR Black Sox Scandal Research Committee. For more details, please visit www.blackbarrelmedia.com
22
Pain is at the root of most drama and entertainment. When does it get too real? This very disturbing and graphic show looks into some case studies and asks some deep questions. WARNING Very intense subject matter.
23
We sat down with renowned filmmaker Ken Burns to talk about his new documentary series Country music and his process as a storyteller.
24
We're revisiting a 2013 episode about John Harvey Kellogg. His last name is famous for breakfast cereal, but was a 19th-century doctor with some unique (and groundbreaking) beliefs about health and wellness.His Battle Creek Sanitarium was home to anything but treatment as usual. The first episode of Modern Ruhles is now available. You can listen to it here.   Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
25
On this episode of BackStory, Ed, Joanne, and Nathan explore how people are repurposing plantations and engaging with the sites' nuanced histories.
26
Venetian portraitist Carriera achieved a surprising level of success in the male-dominated European art world of the early 1700s. Her work helped popularize pastels and her portraits were commissioned by Europe's most prominent figures. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
27
If this were a movie, the events and cameos would be too numerous and star-studded to mention. It includes Xerxes, Spartans, Immortals, Alexander the Great, scythed chariots, and several of the greatest battles in history.
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In the mid 1990s, Enron Corporation solidifies its position as the number one energy company in America. Investment manager Sherron Watkins lands a dream job there, but quickly learns that Enron's office culture and accounting practices make it a treacherous place to work.
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Whether you're looking for a dream come true, or just want to set the record straight, today's tour through the cabinet will deliver what you need.
30
From Biblical-era coup conspiracies to the horrific aftermath of ancient combat this second installment of the series on the Kings of Achaemenid Persia goes where only Dan can take it. For better or worse…
31
The Wall Street Journal works to expose the shady financial deals key to Enron’s success. With his company pushed to the brink of bankruptcy, Ken Lay engages in a desperate ploy to avert disaster. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Better Help - To get 10% off your first month, go to betterhelp.com/AS
32
A bizarre monument made of granite and bearing a list of instructions for humanity’s survival exists on a hill in Georgia. While these Guidestones may just be an eccentric project of an anonymous man with too much time and money, there has long been a theory that they actually link to the dogma of some secret, sinister society.
33
Most US residents are familiar with the famous Boston Tea Party - but it was far from the only conflict of this type. Join the guys as they explore Rhode Island’s Gaspee Affair, and why it’s sometimes called Rhode Island’s Boston Tea Party. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
34
The same day Queen Liliuokalani proposed a new constitution for Hawaii that would restore power to the monarchy and grant native Hawaiians the right to vote in elections, a group of white businessmen met at a law office in Honolulu, and hatched a plan that would change the course of nations.
35
How one organization changed the American public's relationship with waste and who is ultimately responsible for it.
36
New Amsterdam was a desperate place. For the first decade of its existence, the Dutch city on the tip of Manhattan Island served as a haven for pirates, prostitutes and smugglers. That was because the West India Company, which ran New Amsterdam, insisted on controlling all trade — something it simply couldn't manage effectively. Finally, in 1640, the Company gave up its monopoly, and what had been a rag-tag, Wild West kind of town quickly took on the hallmarks of Dutch capitalism.  Trading firms in Amsterdam opened branch offices on Manhattan, and business boomed. Merchants traded in everything from furs to tobacco to Caribbean sugar and salt. Soon, Manhattan became a brash, free-wheeling pioneer settlement where visitors could hear some 18 different languages — at a time when the city’s population numbered only about 500. The ingredients were in place for an American success story utterly unlike the English colonies to the north.  Support us by supporting our sponsors! Brooklinen - Get 10% off AND free shipping when you use promo code TELLERS at Brooklinen.com Quip - Quip starts at just $25 and if you go to GETQUIP.com/TELLERS right now, you can get your first refill pack for FREE
37
Alone among the world's regions, western Europe only had one major, long-lived imperial experience: that of Rome. When it fell, nothing like it ever returned again. According to Stanford's Professor Walter Scheidel, that fact had enormous consequences for the long-term development of Europe, and was a necessary precursor to the rise of modernity. Check out Professor Scheidel's new book, Escape From Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity, which comes out October 15th. And you are supporting this show when you support our sponsors, like Keeps! Keeps - Go to Keeps.com/TIDES to get your first month of treatment for free.
38
The 1954 coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Guatemala was orchestrated by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Part one will outline the various influences leading up to the coup, including the involvement of United Fruit Company. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
39
The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia, a collective of independently owned and operated podcasts. A note on shownotes. In a perfect world, you go into each episode of the Memory Palace knowing nothing about what's coming. It's pretentious, sure, but that's the intention. So, if you don't want any spoilers or anything, you can click play without reading ahead. Anyway... Music  We hear Vaggvisa by Henrik Lindstrand. Then Kestrel, off the album by the same name from Caoimhin O Raghallaigh. Ljuva mekaniska jag by 1900. A loop from When it's Time to Go, by Buddy Fo & his Group. A bit of Movement II from Martynov, "Come in!" by Vladimir Martynov. Making Love in the Apartment from Krysztof Komeda's score to Rosemary's Baby. And the Mistral Noir, from Daniel Herkedal. Notes There's a lot written about Kelly and his times, none more enjoyable than Bill Bryson's in One Summer: America, 1927. The best academic book that touches on Kelly and his times is Dance Marathons: Performing American Culture in the 1920s and 30s, by Carol Martin.
40
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how, in September 1812, Napoleon captured Moscow and waited a month for the Russians to meet him, to surrender and why, to his dismay, no-one came. Soon his triumph was revealed as a great defeat; winter was coming, supplies were low; he ordered his Grande Armée of six hundred thousand to retreat and, by the time he crossed back over the border, desertion, disease, capture, Cossacks and cold had reduced that to twenty thousand. Napoleon had shown his weakness; his Prussian allies changed sides and, within eighteen months they, the Russians and Austrians had captured Paris and the Emperor was exiled to Elba. With Janet Hartley Professor Emeritus of International History, LSE Michael Rowe Reader in European History, King’s College London And Michael Rapport Reader in Modern European History, University of Glasgow Producer: Simon Tillotson
41
In 1793, the infamous Marie Antoinette was moved to the Conciergerie in Temple Prison. A woman who became synonymous with indulgence spent her final months with almost no personal possessions, separated from her children, awaiting her imminent death.
42
On the morning of March 17, 1892, a group of townsfolk in rural Rhode Island dug up the graves of three local women. What they did to their bodies was something that we might find shocking, yet was actually normal in their culture. What was it in their past that guided their actions? Were they merely a product of their ancestors, or innocent participants in a regional panic?Lore WebsiteNovels by Aaron Mahnke
43
Some threats to our safety and well-being are obvious and easy to spot from a mile away. Over the course of history, people have become very skilled at looking for danger and avoiding it. But some threats are more difficult to spot—and once they strike, the results can be deadly.* * *This episode of Lore was sponsored by:Casper: Discover Casper’s new Hybrid mattress, which combines the pressure relief of their award-winning foam with durable-yet-gentle springs. Try it for 100 nights—risk-free—in your own home. Visit Casper.com/Lore to get $100 toward select mattresses by using the offer code LORE. Terms and conditions apply.The Great Courses Plus: Hundreds of topics taught by professors and experts, all in one enormous video library. Listen or watch on your computer or mobile device. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/lore today to start your special FREE MONTH of unlimited access to their full lecture library—and don't miss my newest recommendation: “The Real History of Secret Societies”...created in partnership wi