Explore top podcasts in Arts

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1
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner talks about how current issues of racial inequality, voter suppression and mass incarceration relate to the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. They were added to the constitution after the Civil War and gave black men the right to vote, gave people equal protection under the laws, and granted citizenship to all people born in the U.S. His new book is 'The Second Founding.' Also, we remember pioneering NPR journalist Cokie Roberts, who died today at 75.
2
In their new book, 'The Education of Brett Kavanaugh,' 'New York Times' reporters Kate Kelly and Robin Pogrebin investigate the allegations against the Supreme Court justice and what was omitted from the confirmation hearings. They discuss Kavanaugh's behavior at Yale, their interviews with Christine Blasey Ford and Deborah Ramirez, and why the FBI didn't talk to witnesses Ramirez provided.
3
Everything in Bethel, Alaska comes in by cargo plane or barge, and even when something stops working, it’s often too expensive and too inconvenient to get it out again. So junk accumulates. Diane McEachern has been a resident of Bethel for about 20 years, and she’s made it her personal mission to count every single dead car in the city. Dead cars are the most visible manifestation of the town’s junk problem. You see them everywhere -- broken down, abandoned, left to rust and rot out in the elements. Dead Cars Plus, a preview of Radiotopia’s newest series Passenger List. Subscribe!
4
A special live edition of The Moth Radio Hour from the 2014 World Science Festival in New York City. A doctor who studies memory is confronted with her own father’s memory loss, a boy attempts to take control of his life by planning the perfect Bar Mitzvah, an archeologist fights against the rising waters, and […]
5
Stephen Kinzer's book, 'Poisoner in Chief,' exposes how CIA scientist Sidney Gottlieb worked in the 1950s and early '60s to develop mind control drugs and deadly toxins that could be used against enemies of the U.S. government. Gottlieb believed the key to mind control was LSD, and is credited with bringing the drug to the U.S. He also experimented on unwitting people in prisons and detention centers in Japan, Germany, and the Philippines.Critic Ken Tucker reviews Ken Burns' new 8-part documentary series, 'Country Music.'Tan France says he almost turned down the job of fashion expert in the Netflix series 'Queer Eye.' "The thought of being one of the very first openly gay South Asian men on a major show. ...That pressure was so hard to handle," he says. But then he thought it was an opportunity to change the narrative about his community. His memoir is 'Naturally Tan.'
6
To study a system as complex as the entire universe, astrophysicists need to be experts at extracting simple solutions from large data sets. What else could they do with this expertise? In an interdisciplinary talk, TED Fellow and astrophysicist Federica Bianco explains how she uses astrophysical data analysis to solve urban and social problems -- as well as stellar mysteries.
7
This week, two stories of when technology really isn’t the answer. Hosted by: Dan Kennedy Storytellers: Jill Bergman, Aylie Baker
8
In a moving talk, journalist Johann Hari shares fresh insights on the causes of depression and anxiety from experts around the world -- as well as some exciting emerging solutions. "If you're depressed or anxious, you're not weak and you're not crazy -- you're a human being with unmet needs," Hari says.
9
A young woman is told to keep her heritage a secret...by her mother; a reckless partier gets shipwrecked and has to sober up enough to save the day; and an author contends with her unsupportive mother on her deathbed. Hosted by The Moth’s Executive Producer, Sarah Austin Jenness. The Moth Radio Houris produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media.
10
Now that China isn't taking our recycling anymore, where will it go? Environmental scientist Kate O'Neill discusses recycling and the global politics of waste. "Once you throw something away, you've got to think about where's it going to go next," she says. Her book is 'Waste.' Also, critic Ken Tucker reviews Ken Burns' new 8-part documentary series, 'Country Music.'
11
The Mexican-American singer spoke with Terry Gross in 2013 about her career and her Parkinson's diagnosis. The new documentary, 'The Sound of My Voice,' traces Ronstadt's career from the late '60s onward.Also, critic John Powers reviews the movie 'Hustlers,' starring Jennifer Lopez, Constance Wu and Cardi B as high-end exotic dancers who get involved in crime.
12
Rising carbon levels in the atmosphere can make plants grow faster, but there's another hidden consequence: they rob plants of the nutrients and vitamins we need to survive. In a talk about global food security, epidemiologist Kristie Ebi explores the potentially massive health consequences of this growing nutrition crisis -- and explores the steps we can take to ensure all people have access to safe, healthy food.
13
Hrolf Kraki, the Viking king of Denmark, sets out to avenge his father and fight way too many mythological creatures
14
France, the son of Pakistani Muslim immigrants, says he almost turned down the job of fashion expert in the Netflix series 'Queer Eye.' "The thought of being one of the very first openly gay South Asian men on a major show. ...That pressure was so hard to handle," he says. But then he thought it was an opportunity to change the narrative about his community. "I've got to continue to show that Pakistanis are wonderful people, that we are caring people." His new memoir about his childhood in the U.K., marrying a Mormon man, and his career in fashion is 'Naturally Tan.'
15
Rising inequality and growing political instability are the direct result of decades of bad economic theory, says entrepreneur Nick Hanauer. In a visionary talk, he dismantles the mantra that "greed is good" -- an idea he describes as not only morally corrosive, but also scientifically wrong -- and lays out a new theory of economics powered by reciprocity and cooperation.
16
We survived our first summer as Airbnb hosts to 23 different families over the course of the last three months - and, more importantly, so did the duplex itself! But our first rental season wasn’t without hiccups, high anxiety moments, and surprisingly frequent learning opportunities. So this week we’re taking you behind the scenes of a jam-packed few months of learning the hospitality ropes while juggling guests and (more literally) a very full jug of laundry detergent. Sherry also celebrates the end of a very long “personal renovation” and we share how something simple led us to rethink our approach to cooking dinner.  Be sure to check out younghouselove.com/podcast-146 for notes, links, and photos from this episode.
17
Bonnie Blagg and her two friends call for Bloody Mary in the mirror on her dresser during a middle school sleepover. Bonnie thinks nothing of it until a ghost boy with long, sharp, bloody teeth appears in her bedroom every single night after that.  Happy Friday the 13th!
18
This is the newly updated story of a curvy, kidney-shaped swimming pool born in Northern Europe that had a huge ripple effect on popular culture in Southern California and landscape architecture in Northern California, and then the world. A documentary in three parts with a brand new update about how this episode resulted in a brand new skate park in a very special city. The Pool and the Stream Redux
19
'New York Times' reporters Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, who broke the story of Harvey Weinstein's alleged sexual misconduct, talk about the obstacles Weinstein created to prevent their investigation, getting actors to speak on the record, and the final showdown at the 'NYT' before publishing. Their book is 'She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.'Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the album, 'Love & Liberation,' from jazz singer and composer Jazzmeia Horn.
20
In this hour, discovering one's roots, struggles to be taken seriously, and an unconventional Batman. Stories of finding and being true to oneself. This hour is hosted by The Moth's Artistic Director, Catherine Burns. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by: Catherine Burns Storytellers: Simon Doonan, Lichelli Lazar-Lea, Paul Davis, Michelle Ephraim, Francois Clemmons
21
Saku Yanagawa, Laura Burgess, and Shayna Hooker share stories about international dating, a complicated father, and a nearly deadly relationship.
22
Stephen Kinzer's book, 'Poisoner in Chief,' exposes how CIA scientist Sidney Gottlieb worked in the 1950s and early '60s to develop mind control drugs and deadly toxins that could be used against enemies of the U.S. government. Gottlieb believed the key to mind control was LSD, and is credited with bringing the drug to the U.S. He also experimented on unwitting people in prisons and detention centers in Japan, Germany, and the Philippines. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Margaret Atwood's highly anticipated sequel to 'The Handmaid's Tale,' 'The Testaments.'
23
A woman in a troubled relationship loses her glasses at a rest stop along the highway, and the world shifts in and out of focus. Content advisory: explicit language, abuse From the forthcoming collection A BRIEF AND FEARFUL STAR, to be published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of The Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.  This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses (www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/LEVAR) and Native (www.nativedeodorant.com code: LEVAR).
24
The story of a lifetime falls into a reporter’s lap when he receives a tip about father-son co-conspirators who sell national secrets to Russia.
25
Waiting is something that we all do every day, but our experience of waiting, varies radically depending on the context. And it turns out that design can completely change whether a five minute wait feels reasonable or completely unbearable. Transparency is key. Wait Wait...Tell Me!
26
Alex Lau is BA's all-star staff photographer. He's been with the brand for going on six years, and this week he's talking about how he got his start and what it's like to travel the world with a camera in hand. After that, it's Molly Baz's turn to tell us her top 10 cooking rules.
27
An evangelist searches for souls and customers in the aisles of a Target store, an adolescent money-making scheme is hatched in 1970s Spanish Harlem, filmmaker Albert Maysles (Gimme Shelter, Grey Gardens) pays tribute to his father, and Dan Kennedy has an unforgettable therapy session with a social worker named Milton. This hour is hosted by Moth Senior Director, Jenifer Hixson. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by: Jenifer Hixson Storytellers: Jen Lee, Ernesto Quinonez, Albert Maysles, Dan Kennedy
28
Skin-care guru, CEO, Vermont farmer, single mom, Latina, clean crusader…it’s hard to put Tata Harper in a box. Famous for her gorgeous, fast-acting, high-tech serums, oils, masks, and essences—and for creating all-natural luxury skin care before anyone else had mastered melding the two—Harper knows her stuff about skin and about clean beauty. She’s also one of the most glamorous people we know. She talked to us about her path from girl growing up in Colombia to self-possessed founder of an enormously successful company. Her strategies—for keeping your skin in beautiful shape no matter what your age, for scheduling asa powerful form of self-care (the woman never procrastinates, believe it or not), and for balancing work and life so they always make you happy—are life-changing. You’ll also find out what goes into a superserum that costs $450, why Harper believes all-natural is the way to go, and why (if you needed more reasons) you should make the shift to clean beauty.  (For more, see The Beauty Closet hub.)
29
Community organizer Raj Jayadev wants to transform the US court system through "participatory defense" -- a growing movement that empowers families and community members to impact their loved ones' court cases. He shares the remarkable results of their work -- including more than 4,000 years of "time saved" from incarceration -- and shows how this new model could shift the landscape of power in the courts.
30
This week, two stories from Los Angeles. Hosted by: Dan Kennedy Storytellers: Bryan Kett, Julieta Gilbert
31
Reading slowly -- with her finger running beneath the words, even when she was taught not to -- has led Jacqueline Woodson to a life of writing books to be savored. In a lyrical talk, she invites us to slow down and appreciate stories that take us places we never thought we'd go and introduce us to people we never thought we'd meet. "Isn't that what this is all about -- finding a way, at the end of the day, to not feel alone in this world, and a way to feel like we've changed it before we leave?" she asks.
32
Part one of the story of Hrolf Kraki, legendary Viking king, and his twelve berserkers
33
In this hour, stories of shedding the past and looking towards the future; from fashion faux-pas to exoneration. This hour is hosted by Moth Senior Director, Jenifer Hixson. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by: Jenifer Hixson Storytellers: Chris Foley, Caridad De La Luz, Andrew McGill, Patricia Brennan, Michael VonAllmen