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Onstage, Joplin oozed confidence, sexuality and exuberance, but biographer Holly George-Warren describes the singer as a bookworm who worked hard to create her "blues feelin' mama" persona. Her new biography of the '60s counterculture icon is 'Janis.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews HBO's miniseries 'Catherine the Great,' starring Helen Mirren.
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This week, the tide is high, but we’re holding on! Hosted by: Dan Kennedy Storytellers: Diana Thompson, Karen Crowley
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A woman revisits her divorce; a Freedom Rider shares details of a night in jail; and an unexpected second pregnancy puts pressure on an already difficult marriage.
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Journalist Gilbert Gaul says federal subsidies encourage developers to keep building on the coasts — despite accelerating and increasing risks from climate change. His book is 'The Geography of Risk.' Also, John Powers reviews 'Watchmen,' an adaptation of the comic for HBO, starring Regina King.
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Elton John says his father's early misgivings about his chosen career became a source of motivation: "He gave me the determination to make something of myself." He talks about his volatile childhood, addiction, and fame. His new memoir is 'Me.'Also, Justin Chang reviews the satirical Nazi film 'Jojo Rabbit.' Attica Locke says her new novel, 'Heaven, My Home,' "was about place before it was about a character." The story centers on a black Texas ranger who patrols Highway 59 searching for the missing son of an Aryan Brotherhood leader. Locke spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.
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Farrow's 2017 report on Harvey Weinstein helped spark the #MeToo movement and earned him a Pulitzer Prize. He says in the course of his reporting Weinstein had him followed and his house bugged. Farrow talks about the systemic ways in which top institutions aid and abet powerful people accused of crimes, silence witnesses, and stifle the First Amendment. His new book is 'Catch and Kill.'
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Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead offers an appreciation of singer Anita O'Day, who was born 100 years ago today. O'Day, who died in 2006, inspired the so-called cool jazz singers of the '50s. In her autobiography 'High Times, Hard Times,' O'Day explained that her last name was Colton, but she changed it to "O'Day," because in pig Latin that meant dough, and she hoped to make plenty of it. She spoke with Terry Gross in 1987. Also, we remember actor Robert Forster who died last Friday at 78. He appeared in close to 200 films and TV shows. After decades in the business, his career was revived when Quentin Tarantino cast him as a good-hearted bail-bondsman in 'Jackie Brown.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews the satirical Nazi film, 'Jojo Rabbit.'
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Today we’re sharing how two recent treat yourself moments in our house turned sideways on us and how it shed some light on when to splurge and when to make like Elsa and let it go. One even involves a feature in our bathroom reno that we’ve dreamed about for years, but suddenly can’t seem to justify in actual practice (although it sounds great in theory!). Also after nearly 11,000 people took our “Side Of The Bed” survey, we have some surprising insights about why people sleep where they do. Plus there's been another Color of the Year development and we find the silver lining to a recent personal event that shook us up. Be sure to check out younghouselove.com/podcast-151 for notes, links, and photos from this episode.
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Before 1992, the easiest way to run the time off the clock in a soccer game was just to pass the ball to the goalkeeper, who could pick the ball up, and hold it for a few seconds before throwing it back into play. This was considered by some to be unsportsmanlike and bad for spectators. So in 1992, the International Football Association Board, the committee in charge of determining the rules of soccer, made a minor change to the laws of the game. From that season forward, in every league throughout the world, when a player passed the ball back to the goalkeeper, the goalkeeper could no longer use their hands. The backpass law didn’t seem like a huge change at the time, but it fundamentally changed soccer. Unsure Footing
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Elton John says his father's early misgivings about his chosen career became a source of motivation: "He gave me the determination to make something of myself." He talks about his volatile childhood, addiction, and fame. Elton John's new memoir is called 'Me.' Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a documentary about the iconic opera singer Maria Callas.
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In this hour, stories of the digital space and its affect on the family connection IRL. From digital carts to hive minds and data collection - closing geographical and temporal distance between past and present. This hour is hosted by The Moth's Senior Director, Meg Bowles. TheMoth Radio Houris produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by: Meg Bowles Storytellers: Meg Ferrill, Anaïs Bordier, Trina Robinson
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Attica Locke says her new novel, 'Heaven, My Home,' "was about place before it was about a character." The story centers on a black Texas ranger who patrols Highway 59 searching for the missing son of an Aryan Brotherhood leader. Locke spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger. The new satirical film 'Jojo Rabbit' centers on a 10-year-old boy who joins the Hitler Youth. Writer and director Waititi, who is from New Zealand, is half-Jewish and half-Maori. He plays the boy's imaginary friend, Hitler.
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Today, there are more than a hundred abandoned asylums in the United States that, to many people, probably seem scary and imposing, but not so long ago they weren't seen as scary at all. Many of them were built part of a treatment regimen developed by a singular Philadelphia doctor named Thomas Story Kirkbride. Kirkbride was obsessed with architecture and how it could be harnessed therapeutically to cure people suffering from mental illness. The Kirkbride Plan
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It's Spooked Season! When supernatural forces come for her kids, Curtis’s mom stands strong. Mrs. Hagstrom may be one of the meanest ghosts yet. Be afraid. Snap Season 10 Episode 27
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You know the most haunted places. The houses, the castles, the hotels. And you know the most haunted objects. The mirrors, the necklaces, the dolls. In this episode, we take you to the Stanley Hotel and introduce you to Robert the Doll. Season 3 Episode 15
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This week, Two women meet by chance on a dark street and share secrets, a father admits he was not quite ready for a second child, and a live calf shows up for Thanksgiving dinner. This hour is hosted by The Moth's Artistic Director, Catherine Burns. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted By: Catherine Burns Storytellers: Mike Birbiglia, Jenifer Hixson, Al Letson, Jeffrey Ruddell
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Growing up in the notorious Westboro Baptist Church, Megan Phelps-Roper was told that God killed soldiers as punishment for America's sins and its tolerance of homosexuality. She started to question her beliefs after she began running the church's Twitter account. Her memoir about her decision to leave the church is 'Unfollow.' Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Parasite,' which he calls "the most deviously entertaining con-artist thriller" he's seen in years.
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We visit one of America’s most famous plantations with three descendants of enslaved Virginians... In 1784, Thomas Jefferson brought the enslaved chef James Hemings, brother of Sally Hemings, with him to France, to train under the French culinary masters of the day. Hemings used what he learned to create a cuisine that was half French, half Virginian, and brought it back to Jefferson's plantation, Monticello. French fries. Ice cream. Mac and cheese. Meringue. All of these foods came to America through the kitchens at Monticello. This week, Dan tours those kitchens with three descendants of enslaved Virginians, including Michael Twitty, culinary historian and author of The Cooking Gene.  Today's sponsors: Go to Larabar.com to explore all the fun flavors. Go to NewMexico.org to plan your trip. Go to Rothys.com/sporkful to get your new favorite flats. Go to SweeTango.com/sporkful to find a grocer near you. Get access to 500+ more Sporkful episodes and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL). Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.