When You're the English Translator for Your Family

Did you carry the role of translating for your parents? The academic term for a child translating for a parent is “language brokering” so you will hear us refer to that in this segment. We also mentioned that children take on a “parentified” role, meaning where a child takes the role and responsibilities of an adult. In this segment, I talked with Lisette Sanchez, about the psychological and emotional effects of parents and children when this cultural value of translating out of necessity is used, such as the tendency of wanting to please parents but also a parent’s frustration and shame. We explored how to support young translators and also parents, along with discussing inappropriate settings where children should not be translating. Lisette shares a story of her time living in Oregon and moments when she experienced fear in speaking Spanish.   Find many important resources below.   You can find Lisette on Instagram @ChingonaScholar and LinkedIN. Her work for the American Psychological  Association was featured: http://www.apamonitor-digital.org/apamonitor/201612/MobilePagedReplica.action?pm=2&folio=52#pg55 Resources Heartfelt and Funny Tweets from Children who Translated: http://remezcla.com/lists/culture/interpreting-immigrant-parents-tweets/ An Article from Chicago: “Language should be a human right”: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/kids-serve-as-translators-for-parents-who-speak-little-english/ Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Parents Rights for Spanish Speaking Parents/Guardians: https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-factsheet-lep-parents-201501.pdf Los Angeles County Library Homework Help: http://lacountylibrary.org/children/tutor/ Each state should have an information page like this; Here is Washington’s: http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

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