Andy Warhol’s Art of Self-Promotion

Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans” has got to be one of the most famous images of the 20th century. But at the time, Warhol’s use of advertising and imagery from consumer culture was super controversial. So was his unabashed desire to become famous. Abbi and Rookie editor Tavi Gevinson wonder what Warhol might do in an age of social media. Then, Abbi gets a behind-the-scenes look at the work of Beatriz González, whose posters covered the city of Bogatá in a brave gesture of political expression. Also featuring: Sarah Suzuki   Andy Warhol. Campbell's Soup Cans. 1962. Synthetic polymer paint on 32 canvases, each canvas 20 x 16" (50.8 x 40.6 cm). Overall installation with 3" between each panel is 97" high x 163" wide. (The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2017 Andy Warhol Foundation/ARS, NY/TM Licensed by Campbell's Soup Co. All rights reserved.)   Beatriz González. Zócalo de la comedia. 1983. One from a set of six linoleum cuts, each 27 9/16 x 39 3/8" (70 x 100 cm). (The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Publisher: the artist, Bogata. Edition: approx. 500. Latin American and Caribbean Fund. © 2017 Beatriz González)   Beatriz González. Zócalo de la tragedia. 1983. One from a set of six linoleum cuts, each 27 9/16 x 39 3/8" (70 x 100 cm). (The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Publisher: the artist, Bogata. Edition: approx. 500. Latin American and Caribbean Fund. © 2017 Beatriz González)    

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